Current News

I am currently in the process of migrating the content shared here to a series of new websites hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com.

As you explore this site, you may find links to a "page not found" instead of something cool and magickal. For this I apologize. I am very working hard behind the scenes to restore those pages along with a link to their homes on my new website where they can be viewed in full.

Thursday, December 31, 2009

Once In A Blue Moon Spell


Here's a great spell to utilize the magical properties of the Blue Moon. You will need the following:
  • A square of blue cloth or sturdy blue christmas wrapping paper. Ideally, the cloth or paper will have moons and stars printed on it, alternatively you can decorate it yourself with glitter glue, stickers, etc.
  • 13 safety pins.
  • Paper and a pen.
  • Length of gold cord or ribbon.
  • Bottle of Champagne, a glass, and a corkscrew.
Get centered, and sit down with your pen and paper and make a list of all the things you would want but which seem impossible. This includes anything that you find yourself repeatedly asking for. Think of "once in a lifetime," or "once in a blue moon," or "that couldn't possibly happen to me," things. The longer the list is, the better.

Now, look at each thing on your list and really think about it. Is this something you really want? If it showed up at your front door tomorrow morning would you really accept it? Are you sure this is for you? Cross off any items that you can't say YES to with enthusiasm.

Pick your top thirteen "geez I wish I could have that" items from your list. Cut your paper into thirteen moon shapes and write one wish on each one. Write it in a positive, affirmative way, such as: "I win millions of dollars in the lottery." or  "I get an all expenses paid month long vacation in Fiji with the person I love."

Open up the square of cloth or paper, and pin the 13 wishes to it with safety pins. (The safety pins insure safety and security for you as your wishes unfold.). Now fold the cloth into a neat little bundle and tie it with the gold ribbon or cord.

Take the champagne, the glass, corkscrew, and your bundle outside under the full moon. Hold the bundle up and say the following:

Please grant me these wishes
With harm to none
And bring me a life filled
With love and with fun.

I give you permission
on this special night
To unbind whatever
I may have closed tight 
to slip past the blocks
to move through whatever might
stop you from granting
these wishes tonight.

By the grace of the Goddess
By the grace of the God
As I say
It is done
So mote it be.

Now, uncork the champagne, and pour it into the glass. Hold up the glass of champagne and make a toast (say a heartfelt blessing) to the moon, and pour a small amount on the ground. Then make a toast to the Goddess and the God (a blessing and a thank-you), and pour a small amount on the ground. Then toast to yourself (something loving and kind), and drink the rest of the champagne in the glass.

Put the bundle in a place where things get worked on regularly, such as desk drawer, office cabinet, or tool box. On New Year's Eve of the following year, make a list of all the wonderful and amazing things that happened since this spell, then toss the bundle (unopened) into a fire with thanks and gratitude.

~Madame Fortuna

Full Moon Luck and Joy Spell


This is a very simple spell. You will need two candles, a white one for you and a blue one for friends and family. As the full moon is rising, light the candles and say:

"I light these candles for luck for me,
and for my friends and family,
So they will burn by day and night....

... I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Book of Shadows, and can be found in its entirety here: Full Moon Luck and Joy Spell

Monday, December 28, 2009

Snapdragon - A Wishing Game

Here is an old old spell you can use as a way to say farewell to the Solstice and make a wish for the coming twelve months. It's less dangerous than it seems, though care should always be taken.
Fill a shallow dish with raisins and pour a few spoonfuls of brandy over them. As you pour the brandy, say the following:

You shall receive whatever gift you may name,
as far as wind dries, rain wets, sun revolves;
as far as sea encircless and earth extends....


I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Book of Shadows (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: Snapdragon - A Wishing Game

Friday, December 25, 2009

Frau Holle


Frau Holle also called Hulda is in old German Mythology the goddess of the dead. She plays a prominent part in German folk-lore and superstition. In stormy nights she can be often heard flying through the air, accompanied by weird spirits and witches. On such occasions it is dangerous for ill-doers to be abroad, as they will surely meet with severe punishment; while to the good she frequently appears as a benefactor. Her particular season is winter; when it snows she is shaking her featherbed.)

Found in:
Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences

A Christmas Salutation

I salute you!
There is nothing I can give you which you have not.
But there is much, that while I cannot give,
you can take.
No heaven can come to us, unless our hearts find rest in it today.
Take heaven!
No peace lies in the future which is not hidden in this present instant.
Take peace!
The gloom of the world is but a shadow.
Behind it, yet within our reach, is joy.
Take joy!
And so at this Christmastime, I greet you,
With the prayer that for you, now, and forever,
The day breaks, and the shadows flee away.

~Italian 16th Century benison

Thursday, December 24, 2009

'Twas the night before Yule


'Twas the night before Yule, and all through the Coven,
The cookies were baked and removed from the oven.
The bayberry candles were lit on the table,
The altar was wrapped in a new cloth of sable.

The children were nestled, all snug in their beds,
While visions of Yuletime danced in their heads....

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Widdershins (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: 'Twas the night before Yule


A Winter Solstice Story For Children

A group of little Faeries huddled in their home deep under the roots of a giant oak tree. They were safe and snug in their tiny underground cave lined with dandelion fluff, bird feathers, and dried moss.

Outside, the wind blew cold and the snow fell softly down to cover the ground. "I saw the Sun King today," the faerie named Rose said as she pulled her mossy cloak tighter about her. "He looked so old and tired as he walked off through the forest. What is wrong with him?

"The great oak said he's dying" answered Daffodil.

"Dying? Oh, what will we do now?", Little Meadow Grass started to cry, "If the Sun King dies, our little plant friends will not grow. The Birds will not come and sing again. Everything will be winter for ever!" Lilac, Dandelion and Elder Blossom tried to comfort their friend, but they were all very sad. As they huddled together, there was a knock on the tiny door....

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Widdershins (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: A Winter Solstice Story For Children


Saturday, December 19, 2009

The Birthday of the Unconquered Sun


Soon it will be Yule, Christmas, the Winter Solstice. Another name for this special time is The Birthday of the Unconquered Sun, or Dies Natalis Invicti Solis. One really great way to honor the Sun (and yourself) is with a series of body positions called Sun Salutations. An excellent time to begin this ritual is on the morning of the Winter Solstice just as the sun is rising, (facing east). If a sunrise Sun Salutation isn't possible, but you want to include this in your morning routine, pick a time before breakfast, and that will be fine.

The Sun Salutation, (Surya Namaskar), is a series of 12 yoga postures performed in a single, graceful flow. Each movement is coordinated with the breath. Inhale as you extend or stretch, and exhale as you fold or contract. The Sun Salutation builds strength and increases flexibility. Different styles of yoga perform the Sun Saluation with their own variations. However, the flow presented below covers core steps used in most styles.

For the series below, a single round consists of two complete sequences: one for the right side of the body and the other for the left.

Even on days when you think you have no time for yoga, try and do at least one or two rounds of the Sun Salutation. You'll feel the difference.

1. Mountain:
Begin by standing in Mountain pose, feet about hip width apart, hands either by your sides or in prayer position. Take several deep breaths.

2. Hands up:
On your next inhale, in one sweeping movement, raise your arms up overhead and gently arch back as far as feels comfortable and safe.

3. Head to knees:
As you exhale, bend forward, bending the knees if necessary, and bring your hands to rest beside your feet.

4. Lunge:
Inhale and step the right leg back

5. Plank
Exhale and step the left leg back into plank position. Hold the position and inhale.

6. Stick
Exhale and lower yourself as if coming down from a pushup. Only your hands and feet should touch the floor.

7. Upward Dog

Inhale and stretch forward and up, bending at the waist. Use your arms to lift your torso, but only bend back as far as feels comfortable and safe. Lift your legs up so that only the tops of your feet and your ahnds touch the floor. It's okay to keep your arms bent at the elbow.

8. Downward dog
Exhale, lift from the hips and push back and up.

9. Lunge
Inhale and step the right foot forward.

10. Head to knees
Exhale, bring the left foot forward and step into head-to-knee position.

11. Hands up
Inhale and rise slowly while keeping arms extended .

12. Mountain

Exhale, and in a slow, sweeping motion, lower your arms to the sides. End by bringing your hands up into prayer position. Repeat the sequence, stepping with the left leg.


If the stick figures are not quite "doing" it for you, here's a video:

Thursday, December 10, 2009

A Wassail Ceremony

Here is a simple wassail ceremony.

  • Heat a large container of ale or beer - about 3 or 4 pints.
  • Add 1/2 cup sugar and 1/4 cup mixed spices (cinnamon sticks and whole cloves are also excellent)
  • Cut up 2 or 3 small sweet apples and add those.
  • Add 1 1/4 cup of pineapple juice and the same of orange.
  • Squeeze 2 lemons into the brew.
  • Place over a slow flame; then, before it begins to boil, take off the heat and whip up some cream. Let this float on top of the brew like foam.
  • Put into a suitably large bowl (the more ornate the better).
  • Toast several slices of bread, if you have fruit cake you can use pieces of that instead.
  • Now, with a few friends, go out to the tree or trees (see note below).
  • Dip pieces of toasted bread into the brew and place in the branches of the tree. Hang pieces of bread and cake from the higher twigs to encourage robins (guardian spirits of the trees). Bend the lower branches down and dip their ends in the brew.
  • Wet the roots liberally with the brew. Pass the rest around and when everyone is thoroughly warmed up, sing a wassailing song.
  • Lift your glasses to the tree and shout "Huzzah!" three times as loudly as you can.
Note: These don't have to be apple trees, since any tree will benefit from a well-intentioned blessing, but it is traditional to wassail fruit-bearing trees.  You can wassail the trees in your yard, near your home, or trees in some previously selected area.

Wassail Recipe for Yule

For the Wassail's Baked Apples:
  • 1 dozen cooking apples
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons cinnamon
  • butter or margarine
  • 3/4 cup boiling water
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
Core apples and place in an 8 X 8 inch baking pan. Mix sugar and cinnamon, fill apples with mixture, dot tops with butter. Add boiling water and sugar to pan and bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 40 to 60 minutes.

For the Wassail:
  • 1 cup water
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 1 tablespoon nutmeg, grated (for luck)
  • 1/2 teaspoon mace
  • 2 teaspoons ginger (to prevent arguments)
  • 6 whole cloves (to influence people in high places, and for luck)
  • 1 stick cinnamon (same as cloves)
  • 6 whole allspice
  • 1 dozen eggs, separated
  • 4 bottles sherry
  • 2 cups brandy
Combine first eight ingredients in a saucepan and boil for 5 minutes. Beat egg whites until stiff. In a separate bowl, beat egg yolks. Fold whites into yolks. Strain spice mixture into egg mixture and stir. Combine sherry and brandy and bring almost to a boil. Gradually add liquor to spice and egg mixture, stirring rapidly as you do so. Before serving, add baked apples to foaming liquid. Serve in a large cauldron.

source: A Year of Holidays in the Pagan Tradition

Twelfth Night Wassail Celebration

Wassailing the trees occurred on old "twelfth night", the 12th night after Christmas eve, or January 17th on the old calendar. Obviously traditions varied, but in Devonshire, Herefordshire and in other parts of the West Country of England (as well as elsewhere no doubt) families would hold a feast with cakes, cider and in some areas beer and ale too. After a time of eating and drinking everyone trooped out to the orchard to wassail the trees, and wake them up from winter for the coming season as well as scare off any bad energy, spirits or demons .

Ale, beer or cider soaked toast, in some areas special cakes, would be placed in the tree branches or in a fork of the tree, and then be splashed with more cider. Trees might be beaten with sticks...

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, The Pagan Calendar (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: Twelfth Night Wassail Celebration


Wednesday, December 09, 2009

A Pagan Christmas Tree

The Christian tradition of a Christmas tree has its origins in the Pagan Yule celebration. Pagan families would bring a live tree into the home so the wood spirits would have a place to keep warm during the cold winter months. Bells were hung in the limbs so you could tell when a spirit was present.

Food and treats were hung on the branches for the spirits to eat and a five-pointed star, symbol of the five elements, was placed atop the tree.

Sunday, December 06, 2009

Snow Spells

Bury a piece of paper in the snow with a wish for something you want to hold or freeze in place...

Also, use snow to melt down a hard heart. Write the name of someone who is angry with you or cold...

I'm so sorry to do this to you but these two spells have been moved to my new website, Book of Shadows, hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com and can be found in their entirety here: Melt a Heart Spell and Freeze in Place Spell


Ice and Snow magic


The primary purpose of ice magic is transformation. Ice is a combination of water and air. Once frozen, if fire is added, the ice melts.

Floating candles in a bowl of water and ice may seem like a simple type of spell, but it calls for a natural balance to take place....

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Book of Shadows (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com), and can be found in their entirety here: Ice and Snow Magic

Thursday, December 03, 2009

Yule Traditions and Symbols


Kissing Under The Misteletoe - Kissing under the mistletoe was first associated with the Greek celebration of Saturnalia and because it was believed to have the power of bestowing fertility, it became associated with marriage rites. In some parts of England, the Christmas mistletoe is burned on the Twelfth Night because it was believed that if it were not burned, all those who had kissed beneath it would never marry. And did you know that originally the custom was that a man should pluck one berry from the mistletoe each time he kisses a woman under the mistletoe, and when the last berry is gone, there should be no more kissing! (Information from Sara Williams)

Leaving Cookies for Santa - The ancient Celtic peoples left offerings of seeds, oats and oatcakes for the "wee people" and for the Gods or Goddesses of the different tribes. This practice evolved into the modern practice of leaving milk and cookies for Santa Claus....

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, The Pagan Calendar (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) it has been combined with more information, and can be found here: Yule


Winter Solstice Chant

Geese and standing stones and mist,
Baying hounds and hooting owl,
Sparkling stars, snow is crisp
Herne is here. Bring forth the Bowl.


I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Widdershins (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: Winter Solstice Chant


Wednesday, December 02, 2009

Big Winter Moon

The last moon phase of the year is the Big Winter Moon in December, also called Long Nights Moon, or the Cold Moon.

Correspondences:

•Colors: White, red, and black
•Gemstones: Obsidian, ruby, serpentine
•Trees: Pine, holly
•Gods: Minerva, Osiris, Athena, Persephone and Hades
•Herbs: Ivy, mistletoe, holly and berries, cinnamon
•Element: Fire

As the days get shorter and Yule approaches with the longest night of the year, we force ourselves to get through the darkness...

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, The Pagan Calendar (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: Big Winter Moon


Tuesday, December 01, 2009

December Moon Names

What follows is a list (in alphabetical order) of the names given to the December moon. Also listed is the tradition and/or origin of that moon name:


Aerra Geola ~other
Ashes Fire Moon ~San Juan
Before Yule Moon ~Cherokee
Big Bear’s Moon ~Winnebago...

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, The Pagan Calendar (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: December Moon Names


Tuesday, November 03, 2009

Pagan Calendar of Days for 2010

Here is a quick list of pagan, magical, and other holidays for November 2009 through December 2010. You will notice that some of the holidays are different depending on which side of the equator you are on.

November 2009

December 2009
January 2010
February 2010
March 2010
April 2010
May 2010
June 2010
July 2010
  • 4: Independence Day
  • 11: New moon
  • 11: Solar eclipse
  • 25: Full moon -- Blessing Moon
August 2010
September 2010
October 2010
November 2010
  • 6: New moon
  • 11: Veteran's Day
  • 21: Full moon -- Mourning Moon
  • 25: Thanksgiving day (United States)
  • 30: Festival of Hecate Trivia (The night of the crossroads.)
December 2010
  • 5: New moon
  • 17: Beginning of Saturnalia
  • 21: Full moon -- Long Nights Moon
  • 21: Winter Solstice or Yule
  • 21: Litha (Southern Hemisphere)
  • 25: Christmas Day
  • 25: Feast of Frau Halle, Germanic goddess
  • 31: Festival of Hogmanay

Sunday, November 01, 2009

November Moon Names

What follows is a list (in alphabetical order) of the names given to the November moon. Also listed is the tradition and/or origin of that moon name:


All Gathered Moon ~San Juan, Native American
Beaver Moon, ~Algonquin, Native American, Colonial
...

I'm sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, The Pagan Calendar (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: November Moon Names

God Is Alive

God is alive...Magic is afoot...God is alive...magic is afoot...
God is afoot...Magic is alive...Alive is afoot...magic never died!



God is alive...Magic is afoot...God is alive...magic is afoot...
God is afoot...Magic is alive...Alive is afoot...magic never died!

God never sickened. Many poor men lied. Many sick men lied.
Magic never weakened. Magic never hid. Magic always ruled. God is afoot.
God never died!

God was Ruler, though his funeral lengthened.
Though His mourners thickened, magic never fled.
Though His shrouds were hoisted the naked God did live;
Though His words were twisted the naked magic thrived;
Though His death was published round and round the world
The heart did not believe.

Many hurt men wondered. Many struck men bled.
Magic never faltered. Magic always led.
Many stones were rolled, but God would not lie down!
Many wild men lied.
Many fat men listened.
Though they offered stones, magic still was fed!
Though they locked their coffers, God was always served.

Magic is afoot...God is alive...
Alive is afoot...Alive is in command.

Many weak men hungered.
Many strong men thrived.
Though they boasted solitude, God was at their side.
Nor the dreamer in his cell, nor the captain on the hill:
Magic is alive!
Though His death was pardoned 'round and 'round the world,
The heart would not believe!

Though laws were carved in marble they could not shelter men;
Though altars built in Parliaments, they could not order men;
Police arrested magic and magic went with them, ah!
For magic loves the hungry...

But magic would not tarry, it moves from arm to arm,
It would not stay with them; it cannot come to harm:
Magic is afoot! It cannot come to harm.
It rests in an empty palm. It spawns in an empty mind.
But magic is no instrument: magic is the End!

Many men drove magic, but magic stayed behind; Many strong men lied.
They only passed thru magic and out the other side!
Many weak men lied.
They came to God in secret and though they left Him nourished,
They would not tell Who healed;
Though mountains danced before them, they said that God was dead!
Though His shrouds were hoisted, the naked God did live!

God is alive! Magic is afoot...
God is alive...God is alive...Magic is afoot...

This I mean to whisper to my mind:
This I mean to laugh with in my mind:
This I mean my mind to serve
'Til service is but magic, moving through the world
And mind itself is magic, coursing through the flesh
And flesh itself is magic, dancing on a clock,
And Time itself, the magic length of God!

God is alive...Magic is afoot...Magic is afoot...God is alive..
Magic is alive...God is afoot...Alive is afoot...God never died.
Many strong men lied.
They only passed through magic and out the other side!
This I mean to whisper to my mind:
This I mean to laugh with in my mind:
This I mean my mind to serve
'Til service is but magic, moving through the world
And mind itself is magic, coursing through the flesh
And flesh itself is magic, dancing on a clock,
And Time itself, the magic length of God!

Lyrics: Leonard Cohen
Sung by: Buffy St. Marie

Friday, October 30, 2009

Rest In Peace Spells



Do the dead rest easy? Flowers and flowering shrubs may be planted on the grave to serve as barometers. Allegedly if the flowers thrive and bloom, there's no need to worry about whoever's in the grave. Of course some plants are considered better barometers than others....

I'm so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Book of Shadows, hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com, and can be found in it's entirety here: Rest in Peace Spells

Celebrating Day of the Dead


Today is the last day of the Day of the Dead (Día de los Muertos). Honoring the dead occurs in ancient cultures all over the world, and even in modern times it plays an important role in religions. It is founded on the belief that the dead live on and are able to influence the lives of later generations...

I'm so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website The Pagan Calendar and can be found in it's entirety here: The Day of the Dead

Sunday, October 25, 2009

Old Superstitions About Spiders


Never kill a spider, it's very bad luck! Here are some of the "old country" beliefs about seeing spiders and what it might mean:

  • A spider with syrup cures fever.
  • Seeing a spider run down a web in the afternoon means you'll take a trip.
  • You'll meet a new friend if you run into a web.
  • A spider is a repellent against plague when worn around the neck in a walnut shell.
  • Seen running over clothes - a new set of clothes
  • Finding a spider in the morning - Sorrow
  • Finding a spider at midday - Anxiety
  • Finding a spider in the evening - Loss
  • A spider spinning in the morning - Good Luck
  • A spider climbing its thread - Good News
  • A spider dropping on its thread - Good Luck
  • Finding a spider on your body - Good Fortune
  • Seeing a spider cross a wall - Good Luck
  • A spider's web on a doorway - A Visitor
  • A spider on your clothes – Money

Monday, October 05, 2009

Thought for the day!

"... for magic to happen in your life,
you must believe in magic."

~ Lynn Andrews

Thursday, October 01, 2009

Cosmos Lore and Magick

Element: Air
Month: October
Numbers: 2 and 8
Magickal Qualities: Harmony; Order; Symetry; Balance; Simplicity

The name Cosmos comes from the Greek kosmos, meaning order, harmony, or the world.

I'm so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to a brand new mini-site, Magickal Ingredients hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com. It can be found in it's entirety here: Cosmos

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Dictionary of Herbal Intentions


  • Beauty: Avocado, Catnip, Ginsing, Maidenhair
I'm so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my website, shirleytwofeathers.com, and can be found in it's entirety, here, on the brand new mini-site hosted there called Magickal Ingredients.

Eucalyptus for Magic and Healing

Eucalyptus is bound to the Moon and Water. It is used magically for protection, purification, and health....

I am sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my brand new mini-site Magickal Ingredients, which is part of my website, shirleytwofeathers.com, and can be found in it's entirety here: Eucalyptus

Monday, September 14, 2009

Old Moon - New Moon

old moon in the new moon's arms
This particular phase of the moon is called,
"The old moon in the new moon's arms."
Isn't that a lovely way to think of it?

Tuesday, September 08, 2009

Gypsies and Dreaming


Gypsies hold much stock in dreams and are renowned dream interpreters. Although Tunisian and Algerian Romanies are the recognized experts in this field, English Gypsies certainly have been practicing dream interpretation for many generations.

In common with all Gypsies, the English Travelers maintain that through dreams they are being given secret knowledge that could affect their future, positively or negatively. They believe dreams come from the spirits of their ancestors.

Gypsies are actually very observant and, in some ways, very prosaic. The first thing a knowledgeable Romani will do when asked about the significance of a particular dream is to inquire about the person's general health and eating habits. Most of us, Gypsies included, are aware that a lot of dreaming is simply the result of excesses in eating and/or drinking.

Charles Bowness, in Romany Magic, says:

"Apart from those dreams brought on by stomachic derangement there are also those occasioned by some bodily excitation due to a previous pleasant or unpleasant experience. Another cause is tension owing to brooding over some problem or fear of a future event.

To categorize further, dreams of terror can be due to a slight and temporary disorder of the heart. Similarly, a defect in the lungs can be responsible for a dream of bloodshed. To experience some enormous difficulty in a dream, such as hacking a way through a jungle, or trying to penetrate a wall indicates disorder of the liver. Dreaming of sharp pains, knife stabs in the back and the like, is because of kidney disorder. If a dream contains some element of hypnotic regularity such as the swinging of a pendulum, then there may well be a tendency to anaemia."


It is obvious that one cannot simply take any dream and say, "Oh, yes. That means such-and-such." The question is, then, which dreams can be interpreted? The Gypsies say any dream that is especially vivid; one that stays with you after you wake. Additionally, it should be one that is dreamed when you are in good health and have not overindulged the night before.

~Text: Raymond Buckland
~Artist: Kathy Ostman-Magnusen

Monday, August 24, 2009

Old Names For Herbs - A to Z

In the old days, herbalists and midwives didn't use textbook botanical names for herbs. Medicinal and magical plants had colorful descriptive names. Often, old books about magic and herbal healing use the folk names instead of the names commonly used today, and it can be confusing. So, here is an alphabetical listing of those names, along with the common and botanical names in current use. You'll notice that some plants have a variety of names, and some names refer to a variety of plants.

  • A Hawk's Heart: Heart of Wormwood Artemisia absinthium
  • A Lion's Hairs: Tongue of a Turnip [i.e., the leaves of the taproot] Brassica napus
  • A Man's Bile: Turnip Sap Brassica napus
  • A Pig's Tail: Leopard's Bane Arnica montana
  • A Titan's Blood: Wild Lettuce Lactuca virosa
  • Aaron's Rod: Goldenrod Solidago Virgaurea -or- Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • A Bone of an Ibis: Buckthorn Rhamnus cathartica
  • Absinthe: Wormwood Artemisia Absinthium
  • Adder's Fork: Bistort Polygonum Bistorta
  • Adder's Mouth: Chickweed Stellaria Media
  • Adder's Tongue: Dogstooth Violet Erythronium multiscapoideum
  • Alison Alyssum Alyssum spp
  • Angel Food: Angelica Angelica archangelica
  • Angel's Trumpet: Jimsonweed / Datura Datura Stamonium
  • Apple of Carthage: Pomegranate Punica Granatum
  • Archangel: Angelica Angelica archangelica
  • Artemis Herb: Mugwort Artemisia Vulgaris
  • Ass's Ear: Comfrey Symphytum Officinale -or- Coltsfoot Tussilago Farfara
  • Ass's Foot: Coltsfoot Tussilago Farfara
  • An Eagle: Wild Garlic Allium sativum
  • Auld Man's Bells: Bluebells Scilla Nutans, Scilla non-scripta, Hyacinthoides non-scripta
  • Bad Man's Oatmeal: Hemlock Conium Maculatum
  • Bad Man's Plaything: Yarrow Achillea millefolium
  • Bastard: False or White Dittany Dictamnus Albus
  • Bat's Wings: Holly Ilex Aquifolium
  • Beard of the Monk: Chicory Cichorium Intybus
  • Bear's Foot: Lady's Mantle Alchemilla Vulgaris
  • Bear's Grape: Poke Root Phytolacca decandra -or- Uva Ursa Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi
  • Bear's Paw: Root Male Fern Dryopteris Felix-mas
  • Bear's Weed; Yerba Santa Eryodictyon californicum
  • Beggar's Buttons: Burdock Arctium Lappa
  • Beggar's Lice: Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale
  • Bird's Eye: Germander or Speedwell Teucrium chamaedrys
  • Bird's Foot: Fenugreek Trigonella Foenum-graecum
  • Bird's Nest: Indian Pipe Monotropa Uniflora
  • Bishop's Elder: Betony Stachys Officinalis, Betonica Officinalis, Stachys Betonica
  • Bishop's Leaves: Water Figwort Scrophularia Aquatica
  • Bishop's Wort: Betony Stachys Officinalis, Betonica Officinalis, Stachys Betonica
  • Bitter Grass: Ague Root Aletris Farinosa
  • Black Sampson: Echinacea Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea pallida, and Echinacea angustifolia 
  • Blazing Star: Ague Root Aletris Farinosa
  • Blind Eyes: Poppies Papaver Spp. & Somniferum
  • Blood: Elder sap (or another tree sap) Sambucus Nigra
  • Blood from a Head: Lupine Lupinus perennis, Lupinus polyphyllus
  • Blood from a Shoulder: Bear's Breach Acanthus spinosus
  • Blood of Ares: Purslane Portulaca sativa
  • Blood of a Goose: Milk of the Mulberry Tree Morus nigra
  • Blood of a Snake: Hematite mineral form of Iron oxide (Fe2O3)
  • Blood of an Eye: Tamarisk Gall Tamarix orientalis
  • Blood of Ares: Purslane Portulaca Spp.
  • Blood of Hephaistos: Wormwood Artemisia Absinthium
  • Blood of Hestia: Chamomile Anthemis Nobilis
  • Bloodwort: Yarrow Achillea Millefolium
  • Bloody Butcher: Valerian Valeriana Officinalis
  • Bloody Fingers: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Blue Bottle: Bachelor's Buttons Centaurea Cyanus
  • Boy's Love: Southernwood Artemisia Abrotanum
  • Brain Thief: Mandrake Atropa Mandragora
  • Bread and Cheese Tree: Hawthorne Crataegus oxyacantha
  • Bride of the Meadow: Meadowsweet Eupatorium Purpureum
  • Bride of the Sun: Calendula Calendula Officinalis
  • Brown Dragon: Wake Robin Arisaema Triphyllum, Arum spp.
  • Bull's Blood: Horehound Marrubium Vulgare
  • Bull's Foot: Coltsfoot Tussilago Farfara
  • Bull's Semen: Egg of a Blister Beetle beetles (Coleoptera) of the family Meloidae
  • Burning Bush: White Dittany Dictamnus albus
  • Buttons Tansy: Tanacetum Vulgare
  • Calf's Snout: Snapdragon Antirrhinum Magus
  • Candelmas Maiden: Snowdrop Galanthus nivalis
  • Candlewick Plant: Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Capon's Tail: Valerian Valeriana Officinalis
  • Carpenter's Herb: Sweet Bugle Lycopus Virginicus
  • Carpenter's Square: Knotted Figwort Scrophularia nodosa
  • Carpenter's Weed: Yarrow Achillea millefolium
  • Cat: Catnip Nepta Cataria
  • Cat's Foot: White Balsam Gnaphalium polycephalum -or- Canada Snake Root Asarum Canadensis -or- Ground Ivy Glechoma hederacea
  • Cat's Herb: Valerian Valeriana Officinalis
  • Chameleon Star: Bromeliad Vriesia, Billbergia, Aechmae, Annanas, Bromelia, Guzmania, Cryptanthus, Neoreglia spps
  • Cheeses: Marsh Mallow Althaea Officinalis
  • Christ's Eye: Vervain Sage Salvia Verbenaca
  • Christ's Ladder: Centaury Erythraea Centaurium
  • Christ's Spear: Adder's Tongue Fern Ophioglossum Vulgatum
  • Church Steeples: Agrimony Agrimonia Eupatoria, Agrimonia Gyposepala
  • Chocolate Flower: Wild Geranium Geranium manculatum
  • Clear Eye: Clary Sage Salvia sclarea
  • Cleavers: Bedstraw Galium Verum, G. Triforum
  • Click: Goosegrass Galium aparine
  • Clot: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Cocklebur: Agrimony Agrimonia Eupatoria, Agrimonia Gyposepala
  • Colt's Tail: Canadian Fleabane Erigeron Canadense
  • Corpse Plant: Indian Pipe Monotropa Uniflora
  • Cuddy's Lungs: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Crane's Bill: Wild Geranium Geraniaum Maculatum
  • Crocodile Dung: Ethiopian Soil
  • Crowdy Kit: Figwort Scrophularia nodosa
  • Crow Foot: Wild Geranium Geraniaum Maculatum -or- Wood Anemone Anemone Nemorosa
  • Crown for a King: Wormwood Artemisia Absinthium
  • Cuckoo's Bread: Common Plantain Plantago major
  • Cucumber Tree: Magnolia Magnolia acuminata

  • Dagger Flower: Blue Flag Iris versicolor
  • Daphne: Laurel/Bay Laurus nobilis
  • Dead Man's Bells: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Death Angel: Agaric Amanita Muscaria
  • Death Cap: Agaric Amanita Muscaria
  • Death Flower: Yarrow Achillea millefolium
  • Death's Herb: Belladonna Atropa belladonna
  • Delight of the Eye: Rowan Sorbus Spp.
  • Devil Plant: Sweet Basil Ocimum Basilicum
  • Devil's Apple: Mayapple Podophyllum peltaltum -or- Mandrake Atropa Mandragora
  • Devil's Beard: Houseleek Sempervivum tectorum
  • Devil's Bit; False Unicorn Root Chamaelirium luteum
  • Devil's Cherries: Belladonna Atropa belladonna
  • Devils Dung: Asafoetida Ferula Foetida
  • Devil's Ear: Wake Robin Arisaema Triphyllum, Arum spp.
  • Devil's Eye: Henbane Hyoscyamus Niger -or- Periwinkle Vinca major, Vinca minor
  • Devil's Flower: Bachelor's Buttons Centaurea cyanus
  • Devil's Fuge: Mistletoe Viscum Album
  • Devil's Guts: Dodder Cuscuta Europaea
  • Devil's Herb: Belladonna Atropa belladonna
  • Devil's Milk: Celandine Chelidonium Majus
  • Devil's Nettle: Yarrow Achillea Millefolium
  • Devil's Plaything: Yarrow Achillea Millefolium
  • Devil's Shoestring: Black Haw Vibrunum Prunifolium -or- Cramp Bark Viburnum opulus -or- Hobblebush Viburnum alnifolium -or- North American Goat's Rue Tephrosia virginiana
  • Dew of the Sea: Rosemary Rosemarinus Officinalis
  • Dogberry: Brier Hips Rosa Canina
  • Dog's Mouth: Snap Dragon Antirrhinum Magus
  • Dog's Tongue: Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale
  • Dove's Foot: Wild Geranium Geraniaum Maculatum
  • Dragon: Tarragon Artemisia Dracunculus
  • Dragon Flower: Blue Flag Iris versicolor
  • Dragon Wort: Bistort Polygonum Bistorta
  • Dragon's Blood: Calamus Acorus calamus
  • Dragon's Teeth: Blue Vervain Verbena Officinalis
  • Drunkard: Calendula Calendula Officinalis
  • Duck's Foot: Mayapple Podophyllum peltaltum
  • Dulcamara: Woody Nightshade Celastrus scandens
  • Dwale: Deadly Nightshade Atropa Belladonna
  • Eagle: Wild Garlic Allium sativum
  • Eardrops: Dutchman's Breeches Dicentra cucullaria
  • Earth Smoke: Fumitory Fumaria officinalis
  • Earth Star: Bromeliad Vriesia, Billbergia, Aechmae, Annanas, Bromelia, Guzmania, Cryptanthus, Neoreglia spps
  • Eerie: Yarrow Achillea millefolium
  • Egyptian Thorn: Gum Arabic Acacia senegal 
  • Egyptian Gum: Gum Arabic Acacia Senegal, A. Vera
  • Elf Dock: Elecampane Inula Helenium
  • Elf Leaf: Lavender Lavendula officinale or L. vera -or- Rosemary Rosemarinus Officinalis
  • Elf's Wort: Elecampane Inula Helenium
  • Elven: Common Elm Ulmus Campestris
  • Enchanter's Plant: Blue Vervain Verbena Officinalis
  • Englishman's Foot: Common Plantain Plantago major
  • Erba Santa Maria: Spearmint Mentha suaveolens
  • Everlasting Friendship: Goosegrass Galium Aparine
  • Exile Tree: Be-Still Thevetia nereifolia
  • Eye of Christ: Germander Speedwell
  • Eye of Newt: A type of mustard seed with a black spot Cruciferae; Brassica
  • Eye of the Day: Common Daisy Bellis Perennis
  • Eye of the Star: White Horehound Marrubium Vulgare
  • Eye Root: Goldenseal Hydrastis Canadensis
  • Eyes: Any "eye" flowers such as daisies, bachelor's buttons, horehound, aster, eyebright, etc.
  • Fairy Bells: Wood Sorrel Oxalis Acetosella
  • Fairy Candles: Dutchman's Breeches Dicentra cucullaria
  • Fairy Caps: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Fairy Cup: Cowslip Primula Veris
  • Fairy Smoke: Indian Pipe Monotropa Uniflora
  • Fairy Thimbles: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Fairy Wand: Devil's bit Chamaelirium luteum -or- False Unicorn Root Chamaelirium luteum
  • Fairy's Eggs: Nutmeg Myristica fragrans
  • Fairy's Glove: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Fat from a Head: Spurge Euphorbia spp.
  • Felon Herb: Mugwort Artemisia Vulgaris
  • Felonwood: Woody Nightshade Celastrus scandens
  • Felonwort: Celandine Chelidonium Majus -or- Woody Nightshade Celastrus scandens
  • Field Hops: Yarrow Achillea millefolium
  • Five Fingers Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis -or- Cinquefoil Potentilla Reptans, Potentilla Erecta
  • Flesh and Blood: Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis
  • Flower of Death: Periwinkle Vinca major, Vinca minor
  • Flower of Flowers: Ylang-Ylang Cananga odorata
  • Flower of Immortality: Wild Amaranth Amaranthus Hypochondriacus
  • Folk's Glove: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Food of the Gods: Asafoetida Ferula Foetida
  • Foxes' Claws: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Fox's Clote: Burdock Arctium Lappa
  • Friar's Cap: Aconite Aconitum Napellus, Agrimonia eupatoria
  • Friar's Cowl: Wake Robin Arisaema Triphyllum, Arum spp.
  • Frog's Foot: Bulbous Buttercup Ranunculus spp.
  • From the Belly: Earth-apple / Potato Solanum tuberosum
  • From the Foot: Houseleek. Sempervivum tectorum
  • From the Loins: Chamomile Anthemis Nobilis
  • Fruit of the Gods: Apple Pyrus Spp, Malus spp.
  • Fruit of the Underworld: Apple Pyrus Spp, Malus spp.
  • Gall of Goat: Honeysuckle Lonicera Spp. -or- St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum
  • Gallows: Mandrake Atropa Mandragora
  • Ghost Flower: Indian Pipe Monotropa Uniflora
  • Ghost Pipe: Indian Pipe Monotropa Uniflora
  • Goat's Foot: Ash Weed Aegopodium podagraria
  • Goat's Leaf: Honeysuckle Lonicera Spp.
  • God's Hair: Hart's Tongue Fern Scolopendrium Vulgare
  • Golden Star or Goldy Star: Avens Geum
  • Good Luck Plant: Solomon's Seal Polygonatum Multiflorum, Polygonatum Commutatum, Polygonatum Biflorum
  • Goose Bill: Goosegrass Galium Aparine
  • Goose Tongue: Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis
  • Gosling Wing: Goosegrass Galium Aparine
  • Grains of Paradise: Cardamom Elettaria cardamom
  • Granny's Bonnet: Columbine Leaves Aquilegia Vulgaris, Aquilegia canadensis
  • Great Ox-eye: Ox-eye Daisy Chrysanthemum leucanthemum
  • Gravelroot: Meadowsweet Eupatorium purpureum
  • Graveyard Dust: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Gypsy Herb: Sweet Bugle Lycopus Virginicus
  • Hag's Taper: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Hagthorn: Hawthorn Crataegus crusgalli
  • Hair of Venus: True Maidenhair Fern Adiantum Capillus-veneris
  • Hairs of a Hamadryas Baboon: Dill Seed Peucedanum graveolens
  • Hare's Beard: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Hart's Thorn: Common Buckthorn Rhamnus cathartica
  • Hawk's Heart: Wormwood Heart Artemisia Absinthium
  • Heart Leaf: Liverwort Anemone hepatica, Peltigera canina
  • Heart of Osmund: Royal Fern Osmunda regalis
  • Heart's Ease: Violet Viola odorata
  • Hedgemaids: Dutchman's Breeches Dicentra cucullaria
  • Hellweed: Dodder Cuscuta Europaea
  • Herb of Angels: Angelica Angelica archangelica
  • Herb of Circe: Mandrake Atropa Mandragora
  • Herb of Grace; Blue Vervain Verbena Officinalis -or- Rue Ruta Graveolens
  • Herb of Mary: Pimpernel Anagallis Arvensis, Pimpinella spp.
  • Herb of the Cross: Blue Vervain Verbena Officinalis
  • Herb Trinity: Liverwort Anemone hepatica, Peltigera canina
  • Hind Heal: Tansy Tanacetum Vulgare
  • Hind's Tongue: Hart's Tongue Fern Scolopendrium Vulgare
  • Hog's Bean: Henbane Hyoscyamus Niger
  • Holy Grass: Sweetgrass Hierochloe odorata
  • Holy Herb: Yerba Santa Eryodictyon californicum
  • Holy Rope: Hemp (Agrimony) Eupatorium cannabinum
  • Hook and Arn: Yerba Santa Eryodictyon californicum
  • Horny Goat Weed: Common Polypody Fern Polypodium Vulgare
  • Horse Heal: Spikenard Inula Conyza
  • Horse Hoof: Coltsfoot Tussilago Farfara
  • Horse Tongue: Hart's Tongue Fern Scolopendrium Vulgare
  • Hundred Eyes: Periwinkle Vinca major, Vinca minor
  • Hurtlesickle: Bachelor's Buttons Centaurea Cyanus
  • Ibis Bone Buckthorn Rhamnus cathartica
  • Indian God Tree: Banyan Ficus Benghalensis
  • Innocence Bluets Houstonia Caerulea
  • Jack-Jump-About: Betony Stachys Officinalis, Betonica Officinalis, Stachys Betonica
  • Jacob's Ladder: Celandine Chelidonium Majus -or- Lily of the valley Convallaria Magalis
  • Jacob's Staff: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Jesuit's Bark; Cinchona Cinchona pubescens
  • Joe Pye Weed: Meadowsweet Eupatorium purpureum
  • John the Conqueror: Galangal Root Alpinia Officianarum, Alpina officinalis, A. galanga
  • Jove's Flower: Carnation Dianthus spp.
  • Joy of the Mountain: Sweet Marjoram Origanum Marjorana
  • Joy on the Ground: Periwinkle Vinca major, Vinca minor
  • Juno's Tears: Blue Vervain Verbena Officinalis
  • Jupiter's Bean: Henbane Hyoscyamus Niger
  • Jupiter's Beard: Houseleek Sempervivum tectorum
  • Jupiter's Nut: Walnut Juglans Species
  • Jupiter's Staff: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Key of Heaven: Cowslip Primula Veris
  • King Root: Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis
  • King's Clover: Melilot Melilotus officinalis, Melilotus alba, Melilotus arvensis
  • King's Crown: Black Haw Vibrunum Prunifolium
  • Kitten's Breeches Dutchman's Breeches Dicentra cucullaria
  • Knight's Milfoil: Yarrow Achillea millefolium
  • Kronos' Blood: Sap of the Cedar Tree Thuja occidentalis, Thuja orientalis, Biota orientalis, Thuja articulata,Cupressus thujoides, Juniperus virginiana, Cedrus libani, Cedrela odorata, Libocedrus bidwillii, and many more.
  • Ladder to Heaven: Lily of the valley Convallaria Magalis
  • Ladies' Meat: Hawthorn Crataegus Oxycantha
  • Ladies' Seal: White Bryony / English Mandrake Bryonia dioica
  • Lad's Love: Southernwood Artemisia Abrotanum
  • Lady Bleeding: Amaranth Amaranthus Hypochondriacus
  • Lady of the Meadow: Meadowsweet Eupatorium Purpureum
  • Lady of the Woods: Birch Betula Lenta
  • Lady's Cap: Cowslip Primula Veris
  • Lady's Foxglove: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Lady's Glove: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Lady's Smock: Cuckoo Flower Cardamine pratensis
  • Lamb's Ears: Betony Stachys Officinalis, Betonica Officinalis, Stachys Betonica
  • Laurier Sauce: Bay Laurel Laurus nobilis
  • Lion's Foot: Lady's Mantle Alchemilla Vulgaris
  • Lion's Hair: Leaves of a Turnip's taproot Brassica rapa
  • Leopard's Bane: Arnica Amica Montana
  • Lion's Herb: Columbine Leaves Aquilegia Vulgaris, Aquilegia canadensis
  • Lion's Tooth: Dandelion Taraxacum Officinale
  • Little Dragon: Tarragon Artemisia Dracunculus
  • Little Faces: Violet Viola odorata
  • Little Queen: Meadowsweet Eupatorium Purpureum
  • Lizard's Leg: Creeping plants such as Ivy
  • Lords and Ladies: Wake Robin Arisaema Triphyllum, Arum spp.
  • Love in Idleness: Pansy Viola tricolor
  • Love Leaf: Damiana Turnera Aphrodisiaca, Turnera diffusa
  • Love Leaves: Burdock Arctium lappa
  • Love Lies Bleeding: Amaranth Amaranthus Hypochondriacus -or- Anemone Anemone Pulsatilla 
  • Love Man: Goosegrass Galium Aparine
  • Love Parsley: Lovage Levisticum Officinale
  • Love Ro,: Lovage Levisticum Officinale
  • Love Root: Lovage Levisticum Officinale -or- Orris Root Iris florentina
  • Love-In-Idleness: Pansy Viola tricolor
  • Low John, Low John the Conqueror: Galangal Root Alpinia Officianarum, Alpina officinalis, A. galanga
  • Lucky Hand: Male Fern Dryopteris Felix-mas
  • Lucky Hand Root: Lucky Hand Orchid / Salep Orchid Orchis latifolia
  • Lucky Nut: Be-Still Thevetia nereifolia
  • Lurk-in-the-Ditch: Pennyroyal Mentha Pulegium
  • Mad Root: White Bryony / English Mandrake Bryonia dioica
  • Madwort: Alyssum Alyssum Spp 
  • Maiden Hair: True Maidenhair Fern Adiantum Capillus-veneris
  • Maiden's Gum: Common Elm Ulmus Campestris
  • Maiden's Ruin: Southernwood Artemisia Abrotanum
  • Maid's Hair: Lady's Bedstraw Galium verum
  • Mangold: Beet Beta Vulgaris
  • Man's Bile: Turnip Sap Brassica rapa
  • Man's Health: Ginseng Panax quinquefolium
  • Master of the Woods: Woodruff Asperula odorata
  • Masterwort: Angelica Angelica archangelica
  • May: Black Haw Viburnum prunifolum
  • May Lily: Lily of the Valley Convallaria magalis
  • Maypops: Passion Flower Passiflora incarnata
  • May Rose: Black Haw Viburnum prunifolum
  • Miracle of Nature: Century Plant / Maguey Agave americana
  • Mistress of the Night: Tuberose Polianthes tuberosa
  • Monk's Head: Dutchman's Breeches Dicentra cucullaria
  • Monk's Hood: Aconite Aconitum Napellus, Agrimonia eupatoria
  • Mortification Root: Althea Althaea Officinalis
  • Mother of the Herbs: Rue Ruta Graveolens
  • Mother of the Wood: Blackthorn Prunus Spinosa
  • Mother's Heart: Shepherd's Purse Capsella bursa-pastoris
  • Musk of the Wood: Woodruff Asperula odorata
  • Mutton Chops: Goosegrass Galium Aparine
  • Naughty Man: Mugwort Artemisia Vulgaris
  • Naughty Man's Cherries: Belladonna Atropa belladonna
  • Noah's Ark: Ladies' Slipper Cypripedium pubescens, Cyprepedium parviflorum
  • Nose Bleed: Yarrow Achillea Millefolium
  • Nose of Turtle: Turtle's Cap / Balmony Chelone Glabra
  • Old Gal: Elder Bark Sambucus Nigra
  • Old Lady: Elder Bark Sambucus Nigra
  • Old Maid's Nightcap: Wild Geranium Geraniaum Maculatum
  • Old Man: Mugwort Artemisia Vulgaris
  • Old Man's Flannel: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Old Man's Mustard: Yarrow Achillea millefolium
  • Old Man's Pepper: Yarrow Achillea Millefolium
  • Old Uncle Henry: Mugwort Artemisia Vulgaris
  • Old Woman: Wormwood Artemisia Absinthium
  • Oliver: Olive Olea europaea
  • Osmund the Waterman: Royal Fern Osmunda regalis
  • Our Herb: Basil Oncimum basilicum
  • Our Lady's Flannel: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Our Lady's Tears: Lily of the Valley Convallaria Magalis
  • Palma Christi Castor Ricinus communis
  • Passions: Bistort Polygonum Bistorta
  • Password: Primrose Primula Vulgaris
  • Peter's Staff: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Physician's Bone: Sandstone
  • Pidgeon's Grass: Blue Vervain Verbena Officinalis
  • Pigeon Berry: Poke Root Phytolacca decandra
  • Pig's Tail: Leopard's Bane / Arnica Amica Montana
  • Pitchforks: Beggar's Tick Bidens pilosa
  • Plague Flower: Butterbur Petasites Vulgaris, Tussilago Petasites
  • Poor Man's Meat: Bean Phaseolus Spp.
  • Poor Man's Treacle: Garlic Allium sativum
  • Priest's Crown: Dandelion Leaves Taraxacum Officinale
  • Priest's Pintle: Wake Robin Arisaema Triphyllum, Arum spp.
  • Prince's Feather: Amaranth Amaranthus Hypochondriacus
  • Princess Feather: Amaranth Amaranthus Hypochondriacus
  • Pucha-pat: Patchouli Pogostemon cablin Benth
  • Purple Medic: Alfalfa Medicago Saliva
  • Quaker's Bonnet: Lupine Lupinus polyphyllus
  • Queen of the Meadow: Meadowsweet Eupatorium Purpureum
  • Queen of the Night: Vanilla Cactus Cereus Grandiflorus
  • Queen's Delight: Queensroot Stillingia sylvatica
  • Racoon Berry: Mayapple Podophyllum peltaltum
  • Ram's Head :American Valerian / Ladies' Slipper Cypripedium pubescens, Cyprepedium parviflorum
  • Ram's Thorn: Common Buckthorn Rhamnus cathartica
  • Rat Root: Calamus Root Acorus calamus
  • Red Cockscomb: Amaranth Amaranthus Hypochondriacus
  • Red Robin: Knotgrass Polygonum aviculare
  • Resurection Plant: Rose of Jericho Anastatica hierochuntica
  • Ring-o-bells: Bluebells Scilla Nutans, Scilla non-scripta, Hyacinthoides non-scripta
  • Robin-Run-in-the-Grass: Goosegrass Galium Aparine
  • Robin-Run-in-the-Hedge: Ground Ivy Glechoma hederacea
  • Satan's Apples: Mandrake Atropa Mandragora
  • Scaldhead: Blackberry Rubus Fructicosus
  • Scale of Dragon: Tarragon Artemisia Dracunculus
  • Sea Dew: Rosemary Rosemarinus Officinalis
  • Sea Spirit: Bladderwrack Fucus Vesiculosis
  • Seal Root: Solomon's Seal Polygonatum Multiflorum, Polygonatum Commutatum, Polygonatum Biflorum
  • See Bright: Clary Sage Salvia Sclarea
  • Seed of Horus: White Horehound Marrubium Vulgare
  • Semen of Ammon: Houseleek Sempervivum tectorum
  • Semen of Ares: Clover Medicago Sativa
  • Semen of Helios: White Hellebore Veratrum, album
  • Semen of Hephaistos: Fleabane Erigeron annuus, Erigeron strigosus
  • Semen of Herakles: Mustard Rocket / Arrugula Eruca sativa
  • Semen of Hermes: Dill Peucedanum graveolens
  • Serpent's Tongue: Dog's Tooth Violet Erythronium Americanum
  • Seven Year's Love: Yarrow Achillea Millefolium
  • Shameface: Wild Geranium Geraniaum Maculatum
  • Shepherd's Heart: Shepherd's Purse Capsella bursa-pastoris
  • Silver Bells: Black Haw Vibrunum Prunifolium
  • Silver Branch: Apple Pyrus Spp, Malus spp.
  • Silver Bough: Apple Pyrus Spp, Malus spp.
  • Simpler's Joy: Vervain Verbena officinalis
  • Sleep Wort: Lettuce Lactuca, sativa
  • Snake Grape: White Bryony / English Mandrake Bryonia dioica
  • Snake Head: Balmony Chelone Glabra
  • Snake Lily: Blue Flag Iris versicolor
  • Snakeberry: Woody Nightshade Celastrus scandens
  • Snake's Ball of Thread: Soapstone steatite
  • Snake's Grass: Yarrow Achillea millefolium
  • Snake's Head: Leech Hirudo medicinalis
  • Snowbells: Benzoin Styrax Benzoin
  • Soapwort: Daisy Bellis Perennis -or- Comfrey Symphytum Officinale
  • Soldier's Cap: Dutchman's Breeches Dicentra cucullaria
  • Son-Before-the-Father: Coltsfoot Tussilago Farfara
  • Sorcerer's Berry: Belladonna Atropa belladonna
  • Sorcerer's Root: Mandrake Atropa Mandragora
  • Sorcerer's Violet: Periwinkle Vinca major, Vinca minor
  • Sparrow's Tongue: Knotweed Polygonum aviculare
  • St. Bennet's Herb: Hemlock Conium Maculatum
  • St. James' Wort: Ragwort Senecio jacobaea
  • St. John's Plant: Mugwort Artemisia Vulgaris
  • St. John's Herb: Hemp / Agrimony(this is not St. John's Wort)Agrimonia Eupatoria
  • St. Joseph's Wort: Sweet Basil Ocimum Basilicum
  • St. George's Herb: Valerian Valeriana Officinalis
  • St. Mary's Seal: Solomon's Seal Polygonatum Multiflorum, Polygonatum Commutatum, Polygonatum Biflorum
  • Star Flower: Borage Borago Officinalis
  • Star of the Earth: Avens Geum urbanum
  • Starweed: Chickweed Stellaria Media
  • Starwort: Aster Callistephus chinesis
  • Summer's Bride: Calendula Calendula Officinalis
  • Sweet Balm: Lemon Balm Melissa Officinalis
  • Sweethearts: Goosegrass Galium Aparine
  • Swine's Snout: Dandelion leaves Taraxacum Officinale
  • Tallow Shrub: Bayberry Myrica cerifera
  • Tanner's Bark: Common Oak Quercus, robur
  • Tartar Root: Ginseng Panax quinquefolium
  • Tear Grass: Job's Tears coix lachryma jobi
  • Tears of a Hamadryas Baboon: Dill Juice Peucedanum graveolens
  • Thor's Helper: Rowan Sorbus Spp.
  • Thousand Seal: Yarrow Achillea Millefolium
  • Thousand Weed: Yarrow Achillea Millefolium
  • Thunder Plant: Houseleek Sempervivum tectorum
  • Tiger's Chaundron; Lady's Mantle Alchemilla Vulgaris
  • Titan's Blood: Wild Lettuce Lactuca virosa
  • Toad: Toadflax Comandra Umbellata
  • Toad Shade: Trillium Trillium Species
  • Toad Bastard: Toadflax Comandra Umbellata
  • Toe of Frog; Buttercup Ranunculus Acris
  • Tongue of Dog: Houndstongue Cynoglossum officinale
  • Tooth of Wolf: Leaf of Wolfsbane Aconitum Napellus, Agrimonia eupatoria
  • Torches: Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus
  • Tree of Chastity: Hawthorn Crataegus Oxycantha
  • Tree of Doom: Elder Sambucus Nigra
  • Tree of Enchantment: White Willow Salix Alba
  • Tree of Life: Yellow Cedar Thuja occidentalis
  • Tree of LoveApple Pyrus Spp, Malus spp.
  • True Love: Bethroot Trillium Species
  • Turtle Head: Balmony Chelone Glabra
  • Unicorn Horn: True Unicorn Root Aletris Farinosa -or- False Unicorn Helonias Dioica
  • Unicorn Root: Boneset Eupatorium Perfoliatum -or- Ague Root / Star Grass Aletris farinosa
  • Unshoe-the-Horse: Moonwort Fern Botrychium Lunaria
  • Virgin Mary's Nest: Nutmeg Myristica fragrans



  • Wachsgagle: Bayberry Myrica cerifera
  • Water Dragon; Marsh Marigold Caltha Palustris
  • Wax Dolls: Fumitory Fumaria officinalis
  • Weazel Snout: Yellow Dead Nettles/Yellow Archangel Lamium Galeobdolon
  • Weed: Ox-Eye Daisy Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum
  • White: Ox-eye Daisy Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum
  • White Man's Foot: Common Plantain Plantago major
  • White Wood: White Cinnamon Canella, alba
  • Winter Bloom: Witch Hazel Hammamelis virginiana
  • Witch Bane: Mountain Ash Rowan Sorbus Spp.
  • Witch Grass: Dog Grass Agropyron repens
  • Witch Herb: Mugwort Artemisia Vulgaris
  • Witch Tree: Mountain Ash Rowan Sorbus Spp.
  • Witch Wood: Mountain Ash Rowan Sorbus Spp.
  • Witches' Asprin: White Willow Bark Salix Alba
  • Witches' Bells: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Witches' Berry: Belladonna Atropa belladonna
  • Witches' Brier: Brier Hips Rosa Canina
  • Witches' Gloves: Foxglove Digitalis Purpurea, Digitalis Lanata
  • Witches' Herb: Sweet Basil Ocimum Basilicum
  • Witches' Weed: Cinquefoil Potentilla Reptans, Potentilla Erecta
  • Wolf Claw: Club Moss Lycopodiella alopecuroides
  • Wolf Foot: Sweet Bugle Lycopus Virginicus
  • Wolf Grape: Woody Nightshade Celastrus scandens
  • Wolf's Herb: Valerian Valeriana Officinalis
  • Wolf's Milk: Euphorbia Euphorbia spp.
  • Wool of Bat: Holly leaves Ilex Aquifolium

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