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Friday, January 21, 2011

Spells for St Agnes


Here we have a variety of old old spells for St Agnes night which is pretty much dedicated to finding a husband.

On Saint Agnes' night, 21st January, take a row of pins and pull out every one, one after another, saying a Pater Noster, sticking a pin in your sleeve, and you will dream of him or her you will marry. Knit tne left garter about the right-legg'd stocking (let the other garter and stocking alone), and as you rehearse these following verses, at every comma knit a knot:

"This knot I knit,
To know the thing I know not yet,
That I may see
The man that shall my husband be,
How he goes and what he wears.
And what he does all the days."


Accordingly in your dream you will see him, if a musician, with a lute or other instrument; if a scholar, with a book," and so on.

Another dream-charm for St . Agnes' Eve was to take a sprig of rosemary and another of thyme and sprinkle them thrice with water, then place one in each shoe, and stand shoe and sprig on either side of the bed, repeating:


"St Agnes, that's to lovers kind.
Come ease the trouble of my mind."

In many places the notion prevailed that to insure the perfection of these charms the day must be spent in fasting. It was called "St . Agnes' fast."

Keat's beautiful lines commemorative of the day seem doubly exquisite when read after conning the clumsy folk-rhymes:


They told me how upon St. Agnes' Eve
Young virgins might have visions of delight,
And soft adorings from their loves receive
Upon the hony'd middle of the night.
IF ceremonies due they did aright;
As supperless to bed they must retire
And couch supine their beauties lily white;
Nor look behind, nor sideways, but require
Of heaven with upward eyes for all that they desire.

In Scotland the lasses sow grain at midnight on St . Agnes Eve, singing,—


"Agnes sweet and Agnes fair
Hither, hither now repair.
Bonny Agnes, let me see
The lad who is to marry me."

And the figure of the future sweetheart appears as if reaping the grain.

Here is yet another one:

A key is placed in the Bible at the second chapter of Solomon's Song, verses 1, 5 and 17, and the book tied firmly together, with the handle of the key left beyond the edges of the leaves. The tips of the little finger of the charm-tester and of a friend are placed under the side of the key, and then they "tried the alphabet" with the verses above named; that is, they began thus:

"A. My beloved is mine, and I am his. He feedeth among the lilies. Until the day break and the shadows fall away, turn, my beloved," etc.

At the word "turn" the Bible was supposed to turn around if A were the first letter of the lover's name. Thus could the entire name be spelt out.

Found in:Encyclopedia of superstitions, folklore, and the occult sciences of the world
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