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As you explore this site, you may find links to a "page not found" instead of something cool and magickal. For this I apologize. I am very working hard behind the scenes to restore those pages along with a link to their homes on my new website where they can be viewed in full.

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Sun Tea Spell for Acceptance

Materials:
  • 1/2 teaspoon tarragon
  • 1 paper coffee filter
  • 3 family-size tea bags
  • 1 quart cold water
  • Quart jar with screw-on lid
  • Twine or string
Note: This spell invokes the young Sun, and is best performed during the hours of dawn and 9am.

Sprinkle the tarragon in the center of the coffee filter, then gather the edges to form a bag, and secure well with string. Toss the tea bags and tarragon bag in the jar, fill it with cold wter, screw on the lid, and take it outdoors. Holding the jar up to the Sun, ask His help by saying something like:

O Growing Child - Our Sun and Star -
Cast Your rays both near and far
Upon this tea and bless it well
So that its properties expel
Worn-out notons and perceptions
Old ideas and misconceptions
And as You brew it, please imbue
It with an accepting, tolerant view
Of thos things I find so difficult
So its ingestian shall result
In a freedom that I've never known
From expectations that I've sown
In others' gardens as they tread
Their personal paths; and please, too, shed
Your light upon me - guide my way -
As I work through this today
Oh Young Child Sun, now hear my plea
And do just what I ask of Thee

Place the jar in a sunny spot and leave it there to brew until sunset. Then remove the bags, dilute if necesssary, sweeten as desired and drink.

From: Everyday Sun Magic

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Celebrating Krishna's Birthday

Themes: Spirituality; Love; Relationship; Passion; Pleasure
Symbols: Yellow; Lotus
Presiding Goddess: Kamala

About Kamala: The Hindu "lotus girl" of pleasure promotes ongoing faithfulness in our relationships inspired by mutual enjoyment and an abundance of love. Kamala also makes us aware of the spiritual dimensions in our physical exchanges that sometimes get overlooked.

To Do Today:

In India, today is a time to celebrate the birth of Krishna, the most charming and kind incarnation of Vishnu. Kamala, as one of Lakshimi's incarnations, joins in this festivity as his lover and companion. To participate in the gala, eat Indian food, especially hot, spicy items that ignite passion. Anything that includes cinnamon, garlic, or saffron is a good alternative choice, as these items bear Kamala's lusty energy.

To improve your ability to give and receive love, including self-love, wear yellow-colored clothing today, especially an item that is worn near the heart chakra (a blouse, shirt, tie, bra, or perhaps a gold necklace or tie tack). As you don that item, say:

Let pleasure flow freely from my heart;
Kamala, abide there - your love impart.

Wear this same piece of clothing or jewelry again anytime you enact spells or rituals focused on sexuality or relationships.

From: 365 Goddess

About Krishna

Title: The Charmer
Also known as: Krsna
Color: Blue
Attribute: Flute whose sound is compelling and enchanting
Iconography: Krishna's skin is blue; he wears a peacock feather crown.
Offerings: Butter; Sweets
Sacred Site: Krishnajanmabhoomi Temple in Mathura, India is said to be Krishna's birthplace.

Krishna is among the most beloved Hindu deities, worshipped throughout the subcontinent and around the world. He is also a great favorite of independent practitioners. He is among the most widely venerated of all spirits, bar none.

Technically, Krishna is an avatar of Vishnu, however, if so, he is the favorite form. Krishna himself is worshipped in several forms:
  • Krishna is the Divine Child, eternally delightful, mischievous, fun-loving and charming.
  • Krishna is the intoxicatingly beautiful, irresistible lover.
  • Krishna is the young cowherd who lives in an idyllic forest.
  • Krishna is the spiritual teacher, guide and advisor.
Krishna is free, spontaneous and fearless. He is a prankster although never evil intentioned. Despite his sweet, loving nature, he is a powerful spirit who vanquishes the fiercest, deadliest, most toxic demons. Krishna is a pivotal figure in the epic, the Mahabharata. He remains a particularly energetic, active spirit; manifesting to people and appearing in dreams and visions. He is all-powerful and may be petitioned for anything.

Manifestation
Krishna is physically beautiful; charming and charismatic. He has a sharp sense of humor but he is an incredible spiritual adept. Those who have witnessed him recently comment on his very recognizable blue skin.

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Celtic Cricket Lore


THE crickets are believed to be enchanted. People do not like to express an exact opinion about them, so they are spoken of with great mystery and awe, and no one would venture to kill them for the whole world. But they are by no means evil; on the contrary, the presence of the cricket is considered lucky, and their singing keeps away the fairies at night, who are always anxious, in their selfish way, to have the whole hearth left clear for themselves, that they may sit round the last embers of the fire, and drink the cup of milk left for them by the farmer's wife, in peace and quietness. The crickets are supposed to be hundreds of years old, and their talk, could we understand it, would no doubt be most interesting and instructive.

From: Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland

Cricket Superstitions and Lore


For thousands of years, it has been considered lucky to have a cricket on the hearth, especially in Asian countries where crickets were once used as “watchdogs.” When danger approached, the cricket’s chirping would stop.

The cricket is known as “the poor man’s thermometer,” and is believed by some to be a good indication of the temperature. To know the temperature, count the number of chirps a cricket makes within’ fifteen seconds and add the number thirty-seven. This will give you the temperature in degrees.

In East India the superstition of the cricket lies in the story of the peril of the soul which, it is held, can leave the body during sleep. The soul, says this Indian fable, leaves the sleeping person in the form of a cricket emerging from the nose.

Native Americans believed crickets brought good luck as well, and avoided mimicking the chirping out of respect for the insect. At one time, it was said that Cherokee Indians drank tea made of crickets, in order to become good singers like the crickets.

It was generally believed that killing a cricket in your house would bring bad luck. It's possible that this superstition of misfortune from killing a cricket comes from the idea that such an act is a breach of hospitality, the little insect invariably taking refuge in houses, and singing it's cheerful "all is well" songs..

More Cricket Superstitions:
  • It was believed that a cricket can tell of oncoming rain, death, and x-lovers. 
  • It’s very bad luck to kill a cricket, even by accident.
  • If you kill a cricket you will tear your drawers (underwear).
  • If a cricket is caught in a deep crevice in the rock, or between boards, the bystander who does not release him will suffer from bad luck.
  • If you kill a cricket other crickets will come and bite holes in your clothes.
  • A cricket in the house brings good luck.
  • Finding a cricket in your house tells of money on its way or some other prosperity coming. Make sure to not disturb the cricket.
  • A cricket is a lucky house spirit that takes it's luck away when it leaves.
  • The chirping of a cricket foretells sorrow.
  • If a cricket chirps behind the stove, some one in the family must die. Others consider it an omen of good luck.
Note: This post was put together by Shirley Twofeathers for Gypsy Magic, you may repost and share it only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

Insect Freedom Day

Themes: Freedom; Luck; Prosperity; Wealth
Symbols: Insects, the number 7
Presiding Goddess: Saki-Yama-Hime

About Saki-Yama-Hime: The Japanese goddess of fortune and abundance visits today's festivities with her lucky energy, especially for improving your finances. In the spirit of the moment, she also provides a little serendipity to help free you from any burdens weighing you down.

To Do Today:

Throught Japan, vendors line the streets around this time of year with small cages that house crickets and other insects. People purchase these, then take them to temples and free the insects, thereby ensuring luck and prosperity.

This would be a fun activity for children who have a nearby park or woods where they can find a cricket. Alternatively, have them look for an beetle on the sidewalk. Treat the insect kindly all day, giving it little bits of grass or a pinch of sugar. Then, come nightfall, release the creature back to the earth. It will tell the goddess about the human who took care of it! Saki-Yama-Hime can then respond by bringing more good fortune your way.

An adult version of this festival might simply entail not killing any insects today. Take spiders gently outside the home, try not to step on the creepy-crawlies on the walkways, and so on. Generally treat nature's citizens with respect so Saki-Yama-Hime can reward you with liberation and financial Security.

From: 365 Goddess

Freeing The Insects

There is a festival in Japan on May 28 during which vendors sell insects in tiny bamboo cages. Those who purchase the diminutive pets keep them in or near the house during the summer months so that they can hear their songs in the evening. Then, on a day in late August or early September, they gather in public parks and at temples or shrines to set the insects free. When the creatures realize they have been released, the former captors listen to them burst into their individual sounds.

The custom of freeing the insects, also known as the Insect-Hearing Festival, is more common in the countryside. Although no one seems to know its exact origin, it is reminiscent of Italy's Festa del Grillo, where crickets are purchased in cages and kept as good luck tokens or harbingers of spring.

A picturesque rite passed down from feudal days, this festival is held in temple and shrine precincts, public parks, and many gardens. People gather in these chosen spots where they take insects in tiny bamboo cages, some purchased from insect vendors for this ceremony, and set these insects free.

As part of the ceremony, the liberator waits for the insect to get its bearing, realize its freedom, then listen to it as it chirps.

Note: This post was put together by Shirley Twofeathers for Gypsy Magic, you may repost and share it only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

Monday, August 26, 2013

Calling Ilmatar To Conceive A Child

The Finnish-Ugrian goddess Ilmatar was the virgin daughter of Air. she had immense creative powers, and was known as Water Mother, Daughter of  Nature, and Sky Mother. Legends say that she created the world and gave birth to the first great hero, Vainamoinen.

Here is a spell to call upon Ilmatar for help conceiving a child:

Decorate your sacred space with red eggs and small flowers. Burn a pink candle and rose incense. (Pink is for birth and love, not necessarily a girl-child.) Say:

Mother of all mothers, hear my cry.
My arms are empty, my heart full of love.
Ripen my body with a little child,
A soul that needs and loves me in return.
Gift this child with wholeness and health.
Fill my arms, Mother of all mothers.

Sit quietly in meditation. Visualize yourself being drawn into Ilmatar's lap by her loving arms. Lay your head against her breast. Hear her loving heart beat in sympathy. Put your arms around her and tell Ilmatar of your deep desire for a child. Listen to her words of wisdom and comfort. Take as long as you need to fill up with her love and comfort. When you come back, say:

Ilmatar, loving and caring Mother,
My heart beats in time with yours.
All children come from your heart.
I ask sincerely that you entrust me with a child.
This child will be loved and cared for,
For this is truly my desire.

From Moon Magick

Calling Ilmatar for Creativity and Spiritual Growth

The Finnish-Ugrian goddess Ilmatar was the virgin daughter of Air. she had immense creative powers, and was known as Water Mother, Daughter of  Nature, and Sky Mother. Legends say that she created the world and gave birth to the first great hero, Vainamoinen. This son was a great sorcerer and magician. He invented the zither and was such a superb musician that his playing tamed wild animals.

Here is a spell that calls upon Ilmatar for increased creativity and spiritual growth

Decorate your sacred space with red eggs and flowers. Burn cinnamon incense and a pale green candle. Say:

Teacher of magick and wisdom,
Enlighten me.
Bestower of knowledge, 
Open the door to ritual meaning.
Peace and contentment, I ask of you.

Sit in quiet meditation. Feel yourself riding in a boat on a gentle lake. Beside you is the goddess Ilmatar. Listen carefully to what she says. Talk with her as long as you wish. when you come back say:

Healing, knowledge, mental powers,
All come from your creativity.
Eloquence and self-control
I ask now that you give to me.
Guidance I need and inspiration.
Teachers send with motives true.
I desire to learn, to expand my mind.
For these gifts, Ilmatar, I do thank you.

From Moon Magick

Ilmatar - Finnish Goddess of Creation


Titles: Daughter of Nature Goddess of Creation, Water Mother, Sky Mother
Other Names: Luonnotar, Luonotar
Origin: Finland
Depicted as: Virgin floating on the sea
Feast day: August 26

The name Ilmatar is derived from the Finnish word ilma, meaning "air," and the suffix -tar, denoting a female spirit. Thus, her name literally means "female air spirit." In the Kalevala she was also occasionally called Luonnotar,which means "female spirit of nature" (Finnish luonto, "nature")

The story is as follows:
.
In the beginning, says the Kalevala, there was only Ilmatar, the void and a great deal of wind. She was alone in the beginning of time. She lived in the heavens, but eventually she grew restless and slipped into the vast cosmic sea. She floated and frolicked for centuries on this primordial ocean, counting rainbows and letting the wind play in her hair.

She began to long for a son.Her longing was so great that the East Wind itself took pity. She found herself buffeted and tossed by the wind's tempestuous love-making until, exhausted, she could bear it no longer and collapsed. During this storm she became pregnant. And there, inside her, was conceived Vainamoinen, the child of the wind.

The goddess floated for centuries on this primordial ocean, unable to give birth because there was no land. She prayed constantly to the god Ukko, the highest of the gods, to help her. After seven centuries or so she began to give up hope, and Ukko took pity on her and sent a duck.

The poor bird was desperately looking for somewhere to land so she could make a nest and lay her eggs. When Ilmatar saw the bird's predicament, she helpfully raised her knee and the bird came swooping down. Half a dozen cosmic eggs were laid, followed by an egg made of iron. The bird then gathered them all up, sat upon them and went to sleep.

Luonnotar sat and watched the bird eagerly, happy for something to finally be happening after centuries of loneliness and boredom. She became too excited, however, her leg began to heat up, she became extremely uncomfortable. Slowly, carefully, she began to stretch out her leg.. and slowly, inevitably, the seven eggs rolled off and fell majestically into the raging sea.

Now, cosmic eggs are delicate things, as soon as they fell into the waters, they broke open. Ilmatar watched in amazement as the broken shells of the eggs formed the heavens and the earth. The yolks became the sun, the whites the moon, and scattered fragments of the eggs transformed into the stars.
And thus the world was formed. As for the iron egg, the black yolk became a thundercloud.

Ilmatar was delighted with events, and busied herself shaping the lands and adding finishing touches. Even though dry land was now available, Ilmatar continued to carry the child within her for thirty summers while she finished her work. Eventually, she felt a stirring inside her. Vainamoinen had woken up after 30 years of being in the womb and was eager to see the new world. He had quite a struggle to get out, but he managed in the end and eventually, Ilmatar gave birth to Vainamoinen, a bouncing bonny old man, and the worlds first shaman, who then finished her creation.

Compiled from various sources

The Birth of Vainamoinen


From the Kalevala, here is the story of the creation of the world, Ilmatar Daughter of Nature, and the birth of her son, Vainamoinen.


Lonely come the nights upon us,
Lonely dawn the brightening days;
Lonely born was Vainamoinen,
All alone, the poet immortal,
From the beautiful who bore him,
From his mother, Ilmatar -

She, the virgin of the air,
Beautiful maiden. Nature's child,
Long maintained in holiness 
Her eternal maidenhood 
In the far-horizoned heavens,
Level meadows of the air.

But in time she wearied of it,
Was estranged from this odd living,
Always being by herself,
Ever living as a virgin
In those far-horizoned heavens,
In those vast and empty spaces.

So at length she then descended
To the seawaves down below,
To the open clear sea surface
Out upon the open ocean.
Suddenly a storm wind blew,
Out of the east an angry blast
Blew the water to a foam
Heaving up the rollers high.

By the wind the maid was rocked,
On a wave the maid was driven
Round about the blue sea surface
By the whirling whitecaps lifted 
Where her womb the wind awakened
And the sea-foam impregnated.

Thus a full womb now she carried,
Long she bore her burdened belly,
Seven hundred years she bore it
For nine lifetimes of a man,
Yet the borning was unborn,
Still the fetus undelivered.

As the mother of the water
Aimlessly the virgin drifted: 
She swam eastward, she swam westward,
She swam south and northwestward,
Swimming round the whole horizon
In the anguish of her birth pangs,
In her belly's bursting pains.
Yet the borning was unborn,
Still the fetus undelivered.

Then she fell to weeping softly,
Said a word and spoke out thus:
"Woe is me, the water wanderer, 
Luckless girl, misfortune's child!
Now already I'm in trouble,
Shelterless beneath the sky,
Ever rocking on the seawaves
To be cradled by the wind,
To be driven by the billows
On these far-extending waters,
Endlessly repeated billows.

"Better had it been for me
To have stayed the airy virgin 
Than to be as I am now
Drifting as the water-mother.
Its too cold for me to stay here,
Painful to be drifting here,
Wallowing in this watery waste.

 "0 thou Ukko, lord of all,
Hear me, thou the all-sustainer:
Come, 0 come where thou art needed;
Come, 0 come where thou art called! 
Loose the maiden from her misery
And the woman from her womb-ache;
Come thou quickly, soon arriving
Where thy help is sooner needed."

Then a bit of time passed over
Like a tiny rash of rain,
When a scaup, the honest bird,
Came on hovering here and there
Searching for a nesting place,
For a spot to build her home on.

She flew eastward, she flew westward, 
Flew to northwest and to southward
But she cannot find a spot
Even in the worst of places
Where to build her needful nest,
Where to take up her abode.

Hovering, fluttering back and forth
Thus she thought and pondered it:
"Must I make my home on wind,
Build my hut upon the billows
Where the wind can blow it over 
Or a wave can wash away?"

So the mother of the water,
Water mother, airy maiden,
Raised her knee above the surface
And her shoulder from the wave
As a refuge for the scaup
And a welcome nesting place.

Then that scaup, the lovely bird,
Fluttering round and hovering over
Spied the water-mother's knee 
Lifted from the sea's blue surface;
Took it for a grassy tussock
Or a tuft of new-grown turf.

Flies about, flitting here and there,
Settles on the lifted kneecap.
It is there she builds her nest,
There she laid her golden eggs -
Six were the golden eggs she laid,
But the seventh was of iron.

She began to hatch the eggs there, 
Heating up the lifted kneecap;
Brooded one day, brooded two days,
Even on the third day brooding.
Then the mother of the water,
Little mother, airy maiden,
Felt the rising heat upon her,
Felt as if her skin were scorching,
Thought her kneecap was on fire,
That her very veins were melting.

All at once she jerked her knee, 
Agitating every member,
And the eggs rolled in the water
To the tumbling of the tides;
Into bits the eggs were broken,
Shattered into crumbs and pieces.

But the eggs and pieces were not
Mixed up with the mud and water
For at once the crumbs grew comely
And the pieces beautiful.
One egg's lower half transformed 
And became the earth below,
And its upper half transmuted
And became the sky above;
From the yolk the sun was made,
Light of day to shine upon us;
From the white the moon was formed,
Light of night to gleam above us;
All the colored brighter bits
Rose to be the stars of heaven
And the darker crumbs changed into 
Clouds and cloudlets in the sky.

Quickly now the time goes forward
As the hurrying years pass by
While the newborn sun is shining
And the newborn moon is gleaming.
Still the mother goes on swimming,
Water mother, airy maiden,
Swimming on those peaceful waters
Over misty seawaves wandering.
Before her flowed the liquid deep, 
Behind her shone the empty heaven.

In the ninth year, tenth of summers,
Raised her head out of the sea,
Lifts her crown above the water;
Set to work on her creations,
Hastens on her handiwork,
Out upon the clear sea surface,
Out upon the open ocean.

Where she gave her hand a turn
There she put the capes in order; 
Where her foot struck bottom, there
Grottoes for the fish were formed;
Where the bubbles reached the surface
There the deeps were made still deeper.

Where her side had scraped the land
There the level shores appeared;
Where she turned her foot to landward
There the salmon grounds were formed,
And wherever her head touched land
There the broad bays opened out. 

Swimming farther out from shore
She halted on the smooth sea surface
Where she made the little islands.
Then she raised the hidden reefs
Where the grounded ships would founder,
Many a seaman lose his life.

Now the islands were in order
And the small isles of the sea;
Pillars for the sky were planted,
Lands and continents created; 
On the rocks the writs were written"
And the signs drawn on the cliffs.
Yet Vainamoinen is unborn,
Poet eternal not emerged.

Old reliable Vainamoinen
Traveled in his mother's womb,
Traveled there for thirty summers
And as many winters too
On the ocean now so peaceful
In that misty world of water. 

He is pondering, he is thinking,
How to live or how survive
In this dismal hiding place,
In this narrowest of dwellings
Where he never saw the moon,
Never got a glimpse of sunlight.

So he speaks out in these words,
Says it in these sentences:
"Free me. Moon, and Sun, release me!
Thou, Great Bear, do ever guide me, 
Lead a man here through strange doors,
Through these unfamiliar gates.
Release me from this narrow nest,
From this shut-in dwelling place!
Guide the traveler to the land,
Child of mankind to the open
To behold the moon in heaven
And to wonder at the daylight,
Get to know the Great Bear's grandeur
Or just to stare up at the stars!" 

Since the moon did not arrive
Nor the sun come to release him,
Alienated from his birth time,
Impatient of this dull existence,
He pushed against his prison lock
Pressing with his nameless finger,
Slid the bony bolt aside,
With his left toe opened it;
Scrabbling with his nails he came
Crawling through the exit door. 

Headlong in the sea he tumbled
With a hand-turn in the waves.
There the man was left alone
In the rough care of the billows.

There he floated for five years,
Six, seven, even eight years,
Stopped at last upon the surface
There beside a nameless headland,
On a treeless continent.

Struggling up with knee and elbow 
He stood up to see the world:
To behold the moon in heaven
And to wonder at the daylight,
Get to know the Great Bear's grandeur
Or just to stare up at the stars.

That was the birth of Vainamoinen.
Such the daring poets descent
From the beautiful who bore him,
From his mother, Ilmatar.

Sunday, August 25, 2013

Ops for Opportunity

The Roman goddess Ops was a deity of crops, prosperity, and fertility. She was also honored during the Saturnalia, when people exchanged gifts in her name at the festival called Opalia. Also exchanged were dolls representing the receivers as healthy and prosperous. She was invoked by sitting down and touching the Earth with one hand.

This spellworking is best done on the Full Moon, on the Saturnalia, or on the day of the Festival of Ops.

Burn cinnamon or cedar incense. Either make or purchace a green cloth poppet. This is a small cloth, rough figure of a human that is stiched around the edges, with a small opening left for the stuffing. Write your name on the poppet. Stuff it with dried chamomile, vervain, and/or squill. To the herbs add several drops of mint and honeysuckle oils. Sew the opening closed.

As you hold the poppet in the incense smoke, say:

Goddess of opportunity,
Bring good things in life to me.
I'll be alert to all you send.
Goddess, be my helpful friend.

Repeat this three, five, seven, or nine times. The poppet can be left on your altar, carried with you, hung on your bedroom mirror, or in your car. Each full moon you can renew it with this spellworking if you feel it is necessary.

From: Moon Magick

Friday, August 23, 2013

Working With Nemesis

Nemesis, also called Adrasteia (the inevitable), was shown with a wreath on her head, an apple in her left hand, and a bowl in her right. She was the goddess of destiny, and divine anger against mortals who broke moral laws or taboos. Nemesis was a harsh, unremitting force representing acceptance of what must be. At times she would intercede with the Fate deity Atropos to allow a longer lifespan.

Often we have someone in our lives who consistently works at being a real trial to us. This person is sometimes called "our Nemesis," which isn't accurate. The problem, however, can fall under the power of the goddess Nemesis. She can remedy or sweep away interpersonal problems, provided we ourselves are not the cause of them. If we are contributing to the upset, she will stand back and make us work it out. So before you call upon Nemesis, be certain that you have rightfully accepted your share of the responsibility.

Use a black candle for Nemesis, anointing it from the end to the wick with patchouli or orange oil. This will help to create a balance or bring your life back into balance. Place a sliced apple in a dish next to the candle. Light the candle and sit facing it. Explain everything about the interpersonal problem to the goddess in your own words. Then say:

The hand of Nemesis balances the scales of justice.
She untangles the threads spun by the Fates.
Lift the burden of this problem, great Nemesis.
Guide me to the solution.
If there can be no harmony, separate us one from the other.
Untangle my life-thread, Nemesis.
This I do ask with a sincere heart.

Now sit quietly and listen with your mind. Meditation at this time can often calm you and provide possible solutions. You may even be told that you must make decisions and follow through with them. Listen, but look at everything logically. Some solutions may be too drastic and painful to implement. In this case, ask for an alternate solution to the problem.

From Moon Magick

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Ritual For the Corn Moon

Prepare for the ritual in your usual way. According to your personal preference, begin with the following:
  • Ground and Center
  • Cast and Raise circle
  • Call quarters
Invitation to the God:


Lord of the night, join me now in this sacred space. 
Your Lady rides high in the sky and soon will be in and of me. 
Come now to join me in the ancient holy rites. 
So Mote It Be !

Spend a few moments becoming aware of the God presence and light the God candle. Most likely a gold, orange or red candle.

Invitation to the Goddess:

Blessed be Lady Moon, mother of all life. 
I invite your presence in my circle tonight. 
Join me in the joyous enchantment of this Esbat night. 
For behold, I stand here in the light of your love to worship 
in the ancient way and to spin moon magick like my ancestors before me, 
I seek to invoke your primal creative power, that my rite shall be successful. 
Hear me now, my mother, as I bless your bounty and your goodness. 
bless me in turn with your eternal tenderness. 
wrap me in your warm silvery light. 
hold me forever in the protective embrace of your boundless arms. 
So Mote It Be! 

Spend a few moments connecting with the energies of the full moon and light a Goddess candle, usually silver. Honor with songs, cakes and ale, or special reading. At this time you may perform the Drawing Down the Moon ritual or any other magickal workings.

When you are complete, release the god and goddess and thank them for their help and attendance. Release the quarters. Lower and open the circle:

The circle is open 
but never broken, 
So Mote It Be! 

From: Moon Magick
Image found at Etsy

Old English Moon Ritual

An old English moon divination ritual was to gather the following:
  • A key, 
  • A ring, ...
I'm so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Divination (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in it's entirety here: Old English Moon Ritual

Virgo Oil

Add the following ingredients to 1/8 cup of jojoba oil. As you mix the oils, inhale the aroma and visualize the intended purpose for the blend.  For best results, use therapeutic grade organic oils instead of synthetics.
  • 4 drops Honeysuckle ...
I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, The Magickal Apothecary (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: Virgo Oil

Virgo Begins

Themes: Excellence; Learning; Purity; Justice; Knowledge; Reason; Innocence
Symbols: Stars
Presiding Goddess: Astraea

About Astraea: This Greek goddess motivates fairness and virtue within us. She empowers our ability to "fight the good fight" in both word and deed, especially when we feel inadequate to the task. According to lore, she left earth during the Golden Age because of man's inhumanity to man. She became the constellation Virgo.

To Do Today:

In astrology, people born under this sign, like Astraea, strive endlessly for perfection within and without, sometimes, naively overlooking the big picture because of their focus on detail. Astraea reestablishes that necessary perspective by showing us how to think more globally. To encourage this ability, draw a star on a piece of paper and put it in your shoe so that your quest for excellence is always balanced with moderation and sound pacing.

To meditate on this goddess's virtues and begin releasing them within, try using a bowl (or bath) full of soapsuds sprinkled with glitter (this looks like floating stars) as a focus. Light a candle nearby and watch the small points of light as they dance; each one represents a bit of magical energy and an aspect of Astraea. Tell the goddess your needs and your dreams, then float in her starry waters until you feel renewed and cleansed.

The Consualia

In ancient Rome, the Consualia was held annually on this date in honor of Consus, the God of harvests, presaging a good harvest later in the month.

In ancient Roman religion, the god Consus was the protector of grains and storage bins, which among the Romans were subterranean silos. Since the grain was stored in holes underneath the earth, Consus' altar was also placed beneath the earth (near the Circus Maximus). It was uncovered only during the Consualia, his festival on August 21 and December 15.

One of the main events during this festival was a mule race (the mule was his sacred animal). During the festival horses and mules were garlanded with flowers, and given a rest from work. Also on this day, farm and dray horses were not permitted to work and attended the festivities.

Consus is closely connected with the fertility goddess Ops (Ops Consiva). Later he was also regarded as god of secret counsels as his name was also interpreted allegorically in relation to consilium which means council, assembly.

Found at Wikipedia

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Feast of New Bread

In Hungary, instead of Thanksgiving in November, the Feast of New Bread is celebrated on August 20, which is also (in Hungary) celebrated as the feast day of Saint Stephen. The celebration is not confined to religious life. The whole country is ablaze with flags. There is dancing on the streets. Many major works of art have their first presentation that day. The bread eaten on that day is from the new harvest. At night, the seven bridges across the Danube at the heart of Budapest are ablaze with light.

In ancient times, the Feast of New Bread was a celebration of the harvesting of grain, a thanksgiving that there would be food for the Winter months. If you have a garden, this is still an appropriate celebration. If you don't garden, or haven't the space for you, you can still celebrate this old festival in a number of ways.

You can bake rolls or bread from scratch. The very act of mixing and kneading and shaping makes you aware of the Earth Mother's contribution to your life.

If you have a garden, supplement a meal with your harvested vegetables. Make a counterpiece out of a tray of sliced vegetables and Herb Dip.

Another way to celebrate the Feast of New Bread is to offer your services to a soup kitchen or other supplier of meals to the homeless and/or the elderly. If you haven't the time for this, at least make a donation of food or money to such a place.

when you eat your bread, home-baked or otherwise, at this special meal, dip it in a little salt for the first bite. This is a very old custom still followed in many parts of the world today. Begin your meal with a few words of thanks to the Earth Mother who oversees the growth of the grain and all vegetables.

From Moon Magick and other sources

Goddesses of the Hours


The Horae (Greek Goddesses of the hours) personified the twelve hours (originally only ten), as tutelary goddesses of the times of day. The hours run from just before sunrise to just after sunset, thus winter hours are short, summer hours are long. Here's the list:
  • Auge, first light 
  • Anatolê or Anatolia, sunrise 
  • Mousikê or Musica, the morning hour of music and study 
  • Gymnastikê, Gymnastica or Gymnasia, the morning hour of gymnastics/exercise 
  • Nymphê or Nympha, the morning hour of ablutions (bathing, washing) 
  • Mesembria, noon 
  • Sponde, libations poured after lunch 
  • Elete, prayer, the first of the afternoon work hours 
  • Aktê, Acte or Cypris, eating and pleasure, the second of the afternoon work hours 
  • Hesperis, evening 
  • Dysis, sunset 
  • Arktos or Arctus, night sky, constellation 
An interesting practice to bring a deeper understanding of the Goddess energy, and a deeper connection to the rhythms of the day is to take a short moment to acknowledge each goddess at her approximate time. This can be as simple as a small salute or short hello. You might be pleasantly surprised at the magickal turn your life takes when you practice this consistently over time.

The list is from: Wikipedia

Monday, August 19, 2013

Banishing Poverty

Okay so I have been doing this little spell I found on banishing poverty from your life. A really simple spell. The directions given were written in a way that did not really make sense so this is what I did.

I started this seven days before the new moon. Every day I wrote on a piece of toilet paper,  "I banish poverty from my life".I signed my name and flushed it down the toilet. On the seventh day I wrote, "I have banished poverty from my life." Then I signed my name and flushed it down the toilet.

I loved the symbolism of flushing away unwanted 'crap' from my life. We will see how it works. So Mote It Be.

Found at The Gay Mage

Note: I don't see any reason why this same spell can't be used for anything you want to banish from your life.

Lucky Stones and Minerals


ALEXANDRITE is a rare and expensive gemstone, when worn it draws luck and good fortune.

AMBER is the fossilized resin of ancient coniferous trees.It has been used for nearly every purpose in magic. Warm to the touch, it is thought to possess life. Lucky and protective.

APACHE TEAR, a globule of translucent obsidian, is carried as a good-luck charm.

AVENTURINE is an all-around luck stone.

CHALCEDONY, an arrowhead carved of chalcedony is worn or carried for luck.

CHRYSOPRASE is a lucky stone worn for eloquence, success in new undertakings, and to attract friends.

COPPER is a lucky metal, perhaps because of its past solar attributions, and so can be used in combination with any luck-bringing gemstones.

CROSS STONE, a form of andalusite is found in coarse crystals. When broken open or sliced, they display a symmetrical cross pattern of alternating dark and light colors. As with all stones exhibiting unusual shapes or patterns, it is carried for luck.

L-SHAPED stones are thought to bring good fortune, perhaps because this form suggest the conjunction of the spiritual with the physical. They can be carried as good luck pieces or placed on the altar.

LEPIDOLITE is a purplish type of mica rich in lithium. It is a beautiful yet fragile mineral, carried  to attract good luck to it's bearer.

LODESTONE is carried in pairs -- one to protect and the other to bring good luck.

OPAL, due to its flashing colors and beautiful unique appearance, the opal is a luck-bringing stone. The modern idea that the opal is a stone of misfortune, sorrow, and bad luck is untrue and can be traced back to a reference in the novel, Anne of Gierstein by Sir Walter Scott.

ORANGE stones have some of the fire of red but are gentler in their effects. Projective, they have often been seen as symbols of the Sun and are thought to be luck attracting.

SARDONYX was at one time engraved with an eagle's head, set in silver, platinum, or gold, and worn to bring good luck.

TIN is carried as a good-luck piece and can be shaped into talismans to attract money.

TURQUOISE like all blue stones, is lucky and is carried to attract good fortune.

From: Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem and Metal Magic

Sunday, August 18, 2013

Orange Juice Spell for a Fresh Start

Materials:
Small glass of orange juice.

Take the juice outside at daybreak and, facing east, offer it to the Infant Sun by saying something like:

O Infant born into the sky
I offer this to You on high
And offer thanks for Your arrival
And for the role You play in our survival.

Turning clockwise, pour the juice on the ground in a circle around you. Then ask the Sun for a fresh start by saying something like:

O Infant Sun, I call to You
Who starts each day with life anew
Whose birth brings warmth and gives us joy
Whose light the darkness does destroy
Who separates the night from day
Who guides us with His gentle rays
Who gives us hope and makes us smile
Who makes each step we take worthwhile
Who inspires and cultivates
Fresh ideas and captivates
All who feel His golden light
I ask You, Infant Sun, so bright
To bring to me a new beginning
That puts me on the path to winning
What I desire most in my life - 
Free of needless stress and strife -
Oh, bring to me a fresh new start
And I ask You, too, impart
Your courage as I tread anew
The path that I now ask of You
Bring this at once now, Infant Sun
As I will, so it be done

Kiss your hand to the Sun and step over the juice circle. Go indoors and know that a brand new beginning is on its way.

From: Everyday Sun Magic

Saturday, August 17, 2013

The King of the Cats

Here's a great cat story from Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland, by Lady Francesca Speranza Wilde, published in 1887.


A most important personage in feline history is the King of the Cats. He may be in your house a common looking fellow enough, with no distinguishing mark of exalted rank about him, so that it is very difficult to verify his genuine claims to royalty. Therefore the best way is to cut off a tiny little bit of his ear. If he is really the royal personage, he will immediately speak out and declare who he is; and perhaps, at the same the, tell you some very disagreeable truths about yourself, not at all pleasant to have discussed by the house cat.

A man once, in a fit of passion, cut off the head of the domestic pussy, and threw it on the fire. On which the head exclaimed, in a fierce voice, "Go tell your wife that you have cut off the head of the King of the Cats; but wait! I shall come back and be avenged for this insult," and the eyes of the cat glared at him horribly from the fire.

And so it happened; for that day year, while the master of the house was playing with a pet kitten, it suddenly flew at his throat and bit him so severely that he died soon after.

 A story is current also, that one night an old woman was sitting up very late spinning, when a knocking came to the door. "Who is there?" she asked. No answer; but still the knocking went on. "'Who is there?" she asked a second the. No answer; and the knocking continued. "Who is there?" she asked the third time, in a very angry passion.

Then there came a small voice--"Ah, Judy, agrah, let me in,--for I am cold and hungry; open the door, Judy, agrah, and let me sit by the fire, for the night is cold out here. Judy, agrah, let me in, let me in!"
The heart of Judy was touched, for she thought it was some small child that had lost its way, and she rose up from her spinning, and went and opened the door--when in walked a large black cat with a white breast, and two white kittens after her.

They all made over to the fire and began to warm and dry themselves, purring all the time very loudly; but Judy said never a word, only went on spinning.

Then the black cat spoke at last--"Judy, agrah, don't stay up so late again, for the fairies wanted to hold a council here tonight, and to have some supper, but you have prevented them; so they were very angry and determined to kill you, and only for myself and my two daughters here you would be dead by this time. So take my advice, don't interfere with the fairy hours again, for the night is theirs, and they hate to look on the face of a mortal when they are out for pleasure or business. So I ran on to tell you, and now give me a drink of milk, for I must be off."

And after the milk was finished the cat stood up, and called her daughters to come away.

"Good-night, Judy, agrah," she said. "You have been very civil to me, and I'll not forget it to you. Good-night, good night."

With that the black cat and the two kittens whisked up the chimney; but Judy looking down saw something glittering on the hearth, and taking it up she found it was a piece of silver, more than she ever could make in a month by her spinning, and she was glad in her heart, and never again sat up so late to interfere with the fairy hours, but the black cat and her daughters came no more again to the house.

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Hecate Oil Blend

Add the following ingredients to 1/8 cup of sesame oil. Visualize the Goddess as you mix the essential oils and inhale the fragrance. For best results, use therapeutic grade organic oils instead of synthetics.

Ingredients:
  • 3 drops Myrrh
  • 2 drops Cypress
  • 1 drop Sandalwood
  • 1 dried Mugwort leaf (optional)
This blend can be worn during the Waning Moon to honor Hecate, Goddess of the Fading Crescent. It can also be worn during rituals and magicks having to do with death, intuitive wisdom, dreams, divination, witchcraft, transition, child birth, and gateways or passages to other realms.

Note: Be cautious in the use of this blend as Mugwort is quite powerful and used in excess can be dangerous. A mint leaf can be used as a substitute for the Mugwort.

Source: This post was written by Shirley Twofeathers for Gypsy Magic, you may repost and share it only if you give me credit and a link back to this website. Blessed be.

The Chilseok Festival


Chilseok is a Korean traditional festival which falls on the seventh day of the seventh month of the Korean lunisolar calendar. (In 2013, this falls on August 13) Chilseok is derived from the Chinese Qixi Festival. Chilseok is a period where the heat starts to pass away and the monsoon season begins, and the rain that falls during this period is called Chilseok water. As pumpkins, cucumbers, and melons start to flourish during this period, people traditionally offered fried pumpkin to the Great Dipper.

The Story of Chilseok

According to the well-known story, the heavenly king had a daughter called Jiknyeo, who was very good at weaving beautiful clothes. One day, when she looked out of the window while weaving, she saw a handsome boy, a herder called Gyeonwu, just across the Milky Way. She fell in love with him. Finally the heavenly father allowed the two to get married.

Afterward, Jiknyeo did not want to weave clothes, and Gyeonwu did not take good care of the cows and sheep. The heavenly king grew angry, and ordered the couple to live apart from each other, allowing them to meet only once a year. On the seventh day of the seventh month of each year, they were excited to meet each other, but they could not cross the Milky Way. However, crows and magpies worked together to form a bridge across the Milky Way for the couple. After a while, their sadness returned because they were forced to wait another year before meeting again. It is said that crows and magpies have no feathers on their heads because of the couple stepping on their heads. If it rains on the that night, it is said to be the couple's tears.

Chilseok Customs

On Chilseok, Koreans used to take baths for health. In addition, it is traditional to eat wheat flour noodles and grilled wheat cake. Chilseok is known as the last chance to enjoy wheat based foods, since the cold winds after Chilseok ruin the good scent of wheat, making these dishes a must have for the dinner table. People also used to eat wheat pancake called milijeonbyeong (밀전병), and sirutteok, which is a steamed rice cake covered with azuki beans.

Source: Wikipedia

Thirteen - What does it mean?

Thirteen has long been regarded by many as an unlucky or inauspicious number. The Kaballa, for example, says that there are 13 spirits of evil. It's still considered unlucky to have 13 people sitting down to dine because it is a reminder of the Last Supper, where Christ was betrayed by one of the 12 disciples who were eating with him, Judas Iscariot.

Similarly, in Norse mythology, when an honorary banquet was held in Valhalla for Baldur (god of nobility, redemption and admirable strength) among other twelve Norse gods. Loki (the trickster) came to the banquet as the uninvited thirteenth guest. Afterwards, we learn Baldur was slain by Hoor who, to execute the god, was given a magic spear by Loki....

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Sigils Symbols and Signs, hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com and can be found in its entirety here: Thirteen


Tuesday the 13th

In Spanish-speaking countries, instead of Friday, Tuesday the 13th (martes trece) is considered a day of bad luck.

The Greeks also consider Tuesday (and especially the 13th) an unlucky day. Tuesday is considered dominated by the influence of Ares, the god of war....

I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, The Pagan Calendar, hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com, and can be found in it's entirety here: Unlucky Tuesday

Sunday, August 11, 2013

Falling Stars


Falling stars have traditionally had a myriad of metaphysical and spiritual meanings behind them. Stars are, in particular, frequently associated with the idea of the human soul. In the Teutonic mythology of central Europe, it was believed that every person was represented by a star which was attached to the ceiling of the sky by the threads of fate. And when Fate ended your story on earth, she would snip the thread attaching your star and it would fall, presaging your death.

In Romania, there is a belief that the stars are candles lit by the gods (and later the saints) in honor of each person’s birth and that the brighter the star the greater the person. The falling star represents the soul’s final journey to the afterlife as it is being blown out and across the sky by the divine candle keepers. In these and other cultures, falling stars and meteor showers were celebrated ~ they honored the ancestors who had come before them, and in particular the newly deceased who were joining the ranks of the highly venerated generations who had come before.

Even in the Middle Ages after the triumph of Christianity, the pagan equation between shooting stars and the movement of souls could not be snuffed out entirely. And so it was vilified; the shooting stars were cast as the souls of evil and impious men being cast out of heaven and down into the bowels of the earth.

Shooting stars in particular hold a special place with the cosmic mythologies of most ancient civilizations. For the falling star represents an interaction between man and the divine. It represents something moving from a heavenly cosmic plain to the mortal, earthly world. It was probably with some surprise that upon tracking the falling place of a “star” to earth, they would discover a small crater filled with a glassy rock, which, today of course, we call a meteorite.

Many cultures venerated meteor rocks as powerful magickal talisman, sent from the sky gods to the denizens of earth. The ancient Greeks believed that finding one would bring you a year’s worth of good luck and a wish; and it is from them that we have ultimately inherited the idea of wishing upon a star. Native American medicine men have been known to wear them as protective amulets, passing them down through generation after generation of shaman as symbols of their power. And temples throughout the ancient Mediterranean were in possession of meteorites, likewise holding them as sacred objects.

Even in the modern world, a meteorite is one of the most venerated objects in contemporary monotheistic religious practices: the Black Stone of the Ka’baa. Believed to have been sent from God to Abraham and then passed down to Mohammad, the Ka’baa stone is technically a relic of all three Abrahamic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), and is the centerpiece of the holiest of holy Mosques in Mecca in modern Saudi Arabia, a former temple to the local Moon/Water God.

In the modern world we explore the stars scientifically: searching for the answers to the Big Questions regarding the origins of life and the extent of the wider universe around us. We look up at the stars through veils of ambient electric lights and smog, wishing upon them still. We escape to the countryside to truly see the stars as best we may, watching them in place of the television sets which usually fill our nightly vision.

For much of the time mankind has walked the earth, we did not know the stars as we know them to be today: huge balls of plasma energy strung out in space billions of light years away. Instead, we held them on high as something else, something magickal. In ancient societies, when the sun went down, there was the vast illuminated landscape of a starry sky lurking above them: mysterious and constant. It was a distinct part of their cultural worldview; its placement in the heavens and its occasional idiosyncrasies explained as part of ancient mythologies and religions. Imagine their wonder looking up at the night sky and imagining it looking right back at them.

And bear in mind, that without electric lights to dim the view, the night sky would have been distinctly brighter and filled with finer textures and gradients of colors and lights. The Milky Way not a slightly filmier band across the sky but a broad avenue of swirling colors stretching across an upside down starscape: a fitting pathway for the gods or divine river among the cosmos.

Shooting stars have and always will hold a special amazement to those viewing them. For their beauty alone they are worth staying up for.

From: Ray Violet and Within the Sacred Mists,

Shooting Star Night

Themes: Wishes; Peace; Beauty; Pleasure; Cycles; Time; Mediation
Symbols: Falling Stars; Sweetgrass; Peace Pipe
Presiding Goddess: Wohpe

About Wohpe: This Lakota goddess's name literally means "meteor." Among the Lakota she is considered the most beautiful of all goddesses. She generates harmony and unity through the peace pipe, and pleasure from the smoke of sweetgrass. Stories also tell us that she measured time and created the seasons so people could know when to perform sacred rituals. When a meteor falls from the sky, it is Wohpe mediating on our behalf.

To Do Today:

Go stargazing! At this time of year, meteors appear in the region of the Perseids, as they have since first spotted in 800 Ad. People around the world can see these, except for those who live at the South Pole. If you glimpse a shooting star, tell Wohpe what message you want her to take back to heaven for you.

To generate Wohpe's peace between yourself and another (or a group of people) get some sweetgrass (or lemon grass) and burn it on any safe fire source. As you do, visualize the person or people with whom you hope to create harmony. Blow the smoke in the direction where this person lives, saying:

Wohpe, hear my message sure;
keep my intentions ever pure.
Where anger dwells, let there be peace.
May harmony never cease.

Afterword make an effort to get a hold of that person and reopen the lines of communication.

From: 365 Goddess

Saturday, August 10, 2013

Celebrating Saint Lawrence Day

Themes: Fire; Fertility
Symbols: Hearth; Fire; Stove; Cooking Utensils
Presiding Goddess: Fiery Mary

About Auge: In Slavic mythology, Ognyena Maria is the "Fiery Mary," a fire goddess/saint who assists and counsels the thunder God Piorun. Not much is known about her other than this divinity

this post was moved

Friday, August 09, 2013

Spell for a Good Marriage

Goal: To promote a healthy, happy marriage

Optional extras: Pink or blue candle; some symbol of your marriage (wedding ring, wedding picture, picture of the two fo you together doing something happy); lavender or chamomile essential oil or incense.

Note: If you ar both Pagans, you can do the spell together. Otherwise, envision the other partner as being with you in spirit. The spell can also be used for any serious long-term relationship or as part as a handfasting ceremony.

Annoint the candle with oil or light the incense. Then light the candle and envision you and your partner in loving and fun circumstances. Take as long as you need to fix those images in your mind, then say the spell.

If doing this at a handfasting, each partner can take turns saying a section, although each would say the first stanza, and you can hand out the spell to your guests who can repeat the last line of each section.

God and Goddess
As you are joined with each other
So am I joined with (name of person)
In faith and hope and love

Help us to work together
Toward a happy, healthy relationship
Balanced and equal
In work and compromise and love

Let our union be harmonious
Productive, caring and filled with joy
And let us overcome life's difficulties
With cooperation, communication and love

God and Goddess
Watch over this union
And let it grow stronger every day
With passion and joy and love
So mote it be.

From: Everyday Witch A to Z Spellbook

Celebrating Teej

Themes: Fertility; Femininity; Cleansing; Devotion
Symbols: Lotus; Elephant; Dance
Presiding Goddess: Parvati

About Parvati: The celebrated Hindu goddess of women is the center of festivities in Nepal today. Parvati's domain is that of faithful companionship and fertility, as she is the consort of Shiva. Art often shows Parvati dancing, in the company of Shiva, or with an elephant's head.

To Do Today:

Try following Nepalese custom. Wash your hands and feet with henna (or a henna-based soap product) for Parvati's productive energy. Or, go out and swing on a swing set singing sacred songs; this draws Parvati to you.

Another way to invoke Parvati is by giving a special woman in your life (a friend, lover, relative, etc.) a gift in thankfulness for her companionship. The goddess exists within that friendship and will bless the relationship. Take a ritual bath to cleanse yourself of negativity and problems of the last year. Water offerings are also a suitable gift to this goddess. Pour out a little bit on the ground and then drink some to internalize any of her qualities that you need.

Wearing fine clothing and flowers is also customary, because all things of beauty please Parvati. So get out your finery for your celebrations, and put on a boutonniere! Or wear something with a flower pattern to draw Parvati close to your side.

From: 365 Goddess

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