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We've had some drama and are currently doing some internal housekeeping and rewriting here on Gypsy Magic.

It's going to take a while to get things set right here and I am really sorry for any inconvenience this may cause. I apologize for links to a "page not found" instead of something cool and magickal.

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

62 Spells To Defeat Your Enemies

I found these old old spells to protect oneself from enemies in a cool old book printed back in 1903. This section reads more like a short primer on black magick, and I'd advise against creating a lot of bad karma for yourself by trying these out on actual people. I do, however, think that it might be interesting to try using them on noncorporeal enemies such as: procrastination, poverty, racism, addictions, etc.

However you choose to use them, be wise and be warned. "If you wish evil to someone, the evil will come to you." That being said, here they are:

  1. If you tie knots in the willow, you can slay a distant enemy.

  2. If you would bring your enemy to death, pour poison in his footprints.

  3. If you feel fear when you know you are safe, it will prove that when you are in danger you won't think of fear.

  4. An image made of wax, named after an enemy or a person whom you wish ill, stuck full of pins and set before the fire, will cause the person named to pine away as the wax melts.

  5. Indians charm a piece of worsted and tie it across the path of an enemy or across the door, so that when he passes it, it will surely bring death upon himself.

  6. The Devonshire peasant hangs in his chimney corner a pig's head stuck with thorns, believing that so doing his enemy will be pierced in like manner.

  7. A charm to be addressed to the spirit of the three winds: "Spirit of the three winds, hear me when I call. Go and make So-and-So go crazy !"

  8. Old Highlanders will still make the "deazil" around those whom they wish well. To go around a person in an opposite direction to the sun, is an evil incantation and brings ill fortune.

  9. Old women frequently cut a turf a foot long which their enemy has recently trodden upon, and hang it up in the chimney, to cause their enemy to wither away.

  10. The Tamils (a race of Southern India and Ceylon) believe that they can kill an enemy at a distance by a ceremony with the skull of a child.

  11. If you make a cut on the wall of the house of an enemy, the members of his household will quarrel. (India.)

  12. Take six new pins and seven needles, stick point to point in a piece of new cloth, and place it under the doorstep of your enemy; when he or she walks over it, they will lose the use of their legs.

  13. The following is a Finnish superstition: The image of an absent person is placed in a vessel of water and a shot aimed at it, thereby wounding or slaying a hated person at many miles' distance.

  14. If you can get a few strands of your enemy's hair, bore a hole in a tree, put them in, and plug up the hole; you can thus give him a headache which cannot be relieved until his hair is taken out of the tree.

  15. To make trouble for an enemy, take some hair from the back of a snarling, yelping cur, some from a black cat, put them into a bottle with a tablespoonful of gunpowder, fill the bottle with water from a running brook, and sprinkle it in the form of three crosses on his doorstep, one at each end, and one in the middle.

  16. The negroes think that in order to make an evil charm effectual, they must sacrifice something. In accordance with this idea, cake, candy, or small coins are scattered by those who place the charm. The articles thrown away must be placed where wanted, and they must be abandoned without a backward glance.

  17. It is a true charm from the old country, that if you are tired of anyone, you can get rid of that person by taking a bushel of dry peas saying a wish for every one you take out, as from day to day you take out some, and as they go, he will waste and go to his grave.

  18. To cause the death of an enemy, mould a heart of wax and stick pins in it till it breaks. Another charm is to hold the waxen heart before a slow fire. As it melts, the life of the enemy will depart.

  19. To harm an enemy, take salt and pepper and put them into his clothing or his house, and say: "I put this pepper on yon, And this salt thereto. That peace and happiness You may never know." He will soon be miserable.

  20. A sheaf of corn is sometimes buried with a certain dedication to Satan, in the belief that as the corn rots in the ground, so will the person wither away who is under your curse when you bury the corn.

  21. Another form of malediction is to bury a lighted candle by night in a churchyard, with certain weird ceremonies.

  22. The following recipe for avenging oneself on one's enemies is given by Kunn, in Westphalia: "When the new moon falls on a Tuesday, go out before daybreak to a stake selected beforehand, turn to the east and say: 'Stick, I grasp thee in the name of the Trinity!' Take thy knife and say: 'Stick, I cut thee in the name of the Trinity, that thou mayest obey me and chastise anyone whose name I mention.' Then peel the stick in two places to enable thee to carve these words: 'Abia, obia, sabis,' lay a smock frock on thy threshold and strike it hard with the stick, at the same time naming the person who is to be beaten. Though he be many miles away, he will suffer as much as if he were on the spot." All this distinctly depends upon the moon being new on a Tuesday.

  23. To make one die for sleep, dissolve lard and put it in their drink.

  24. You can cast a malefic spell on your enemy by repeating the Lord's Prayer backwards, all the time wishing some evil upon him.

  25. In Southern Italy, the hearts of onions are scorched over a fire in the name of the victim, to burn up their hearts.

  26. There is a superstition among the natives of Natal, that if the plant called Isanywane is placed on a man's hearth, it will cause him to become generally disliked.

  27. Pythagoras says: "That if a flame be put into the skull of a murderer, and the name of your enemy written therein, it will strike the person whose name is so written with fear and trembling, and he will speedily seek your forgiveness and become a steadfast friend."

  28. "If you wish to harm anybody, read the 107th, 108th and 109th Psalm at 8, 11 and 3 o'clock, and you will then have much power over them." (Elworthy, "The Evil Eye.")

  29. The Greeks believed that to measure exactly the height and circumference of the body of an enemy, would cause him to languish and fall away, or die very soon.

  30. If a man hates another and will repeat the 109th Psalm every morning and evening for a year, his enemy will be dead; but if he misses a single time, he will die himself.

  31. In Bombay, if one man puts salt into another man's hand, it makes them sworn enemies for life.

  32. Bury a dead man's hair under the threshold of an enemy, and he will soon be troubled with ague.

  33. To repeat certain formulas among the Hindus, is supposed to bring injury upon an enemy.

  34. In West Cork, people spit on the ground in front of anyone whom they wish to have bad luck.

  35. Never let your enemy get hold of your picture. If he should keep it turned upside down, or should throw it in the water, you would sicken and die or meet with an accident .

  36. If you shoot the picture of an enemy with a silver bullet, you will cause the death of your enemy.

  37. In Germany, old women cut out a turf a foot long on which an enemy had trod, and hung it up in the chimney, in the belief that the enemy would shrivel up just as the turf did, and in the end die a lingering death.

  38. When a man of one of the Indian tribes cannot get what he wants, or if he thinks he has been unjustly treated, he will cut or wound himself, or perhaps take the life of some member of his family, in order that the blood of the victim may rest upon the head of the oppressor.

  39. If you wish to bring ill luck to a neighbor, take nine pins, nine nails, and nine needles, boil them in a quart of water, put it in a bottle, and hide it under or in their fireplace, and the family will always have sickness. (Negro superstition.)

  40. The negroes "conjure" by obtaining an article belonging to another, boiling it, no matter what it may be, in lye with a rabbit's foot, and a bunch of hair cut from the left ear of a female opossum. They say terrible headaches and the like can be inflicted in this way.

  41. The American Indians believe that anyone who possesses a lock of their hair or other thing related to their person, will have power over them for evil.

  42. When the bread is taken from the oven, a few red hot coals or cinders are thrown into the oven by the Magyars, in the belief that it is as good as throwing them down one's enemy's throat. Thus, if one's enemy would partake of that bread, he would come to grief.

  43. Throw a pebble upon which your enemy's name is inscribed, together with a pin, into the well of St. Elian, in Wales, as an offering to the well, and a curse will come upon the one who bears the name, and in all probability he will pine away and die.

  44. To cause an enemy ill luck, make a heap of stones, cursing him as many times as there are stones, and as every Christian must add at least a pebble as he passes by, his woes and his misfortunes will constantly increase. (Greece.)

  45. Not many years ago, there was a system of cursing in common vogue in Fermanagh with tenants who had been given notice to quit. This was: they collected, from all over their farms, stones. These they brought home, and having put a lighted coal in the fireplace, they heaped the stones on it as if they had been sods of turf. They then knelt down on the hearthstone, and prayed that as long as the stones remained unburnt every conceivable curse might light on their landlord, his children, and their children to all generations. To prevent the stones by any possibility being burnt, as soon as they had finished cursing, they took the stones and scattered them far and wide over the whole country. Many of the former families of the county are said now to have disappeared on account of being thus cursed.

  46. The great antiquity of sympathetic magic, by which a person is destroyed if an image of him is made and then ruined again, is shown by the discovery at Thebes of a small clay figure of a man tied to a papyrus scroll, evidently to compass the death of the person described therein. This figure and papyrus are now in the Ashmolean Museum.

  47. A South Sea Islander persisted in saying he was very ill because his enemies, the Happahs, had stolen a lock of his hair and buried it in a leaf of a plantain to kill him. He had offered the Happahs the greater part of his property if they would bring back his hair and the leaf, for otherwise he was sure to die.

  48. It is a widespread belief that one can injure another person by stepping upon his or her shadow. Any injury done to the shadow would have the same effect upon its owner. To cause an enemy's death, it is merely necessary to take his shadow away from him entirely.

  49. Anciently, a small bunch of feathers placed in a person's path was -thought, in Jamaica, to give them a curse. Any piece of coffin furniture hung over the door was also capable of cursing the inmates of the house.

  50. Put ashes from yellow stamped paper, together with ashes from the temple, on your enemy, and he will be sure to be very sick soon. (China.)

  51. The head of a dog and the head of a buffalo, stamped on paper, the paper burned and the ashes collected and mixed with sacred ashes, is also used to make an enemy die, if it can be got into the tea he drinks.

  52. Lisiansky, in his "Voyage Round the World," gives us an account of a religious sect in the Sandwich Islands who arrogate to themselves the power to pray people to death. Whoever incurs their displeasure receives notice that the "homicidelitany" is about to begin. Such are the effects of superstition and imagination that the notice alone is frequently sufficient with these weak people to make them waste away with fear, or else go mad and commit suicide.

  53. The Finnish superstition of producing an absent person in the form of an image in a vessel of water and then shooting it, and thereby wounding or slaying the absent enemy, is believed to be efficacious at a hundred miles distance.

  54. It was at the instigation of Eleanor, Duchess of Gloucester (for which she was imprisoned), that a figure made of wax was used to represent King Henry VI., the intention being for his person to be destroyed as the figure was consumed.

  55. In British Guiana, it is to this day firmly believed by the negroes an
    d others, that injuries inflicted even upon the ordure of persons will be felt by the individual by whom they were left. In Somerset, England, it is also believed that it is very injurious to an infant to burn its excrement. It is thought to produce constipation and colic.

  56. In Australia, the sorcerer has different means of attacking an enemy. He can creep near him when he is asleep and bewitch him to death by merely pointing a leg bone of a kangaroo at him; or he can steal away his kidney-fat, where, as the natives believe, a man's power dwells; or he can call in the aid of a malignant demon to strike the poor wretch with his club behind the neck, or he can get a lock of hair and roast it with fat over the fire until its former owner pines away and dies.

  57. In Calcutta, a servant having quarreled with his master, hung himself in the night in front of the street door, that he might become a devil and haunt the premises. The house was immediately forsaken by its occupants, and, although a large and beautiful edifice, was suffered to go to ruins.

  58. The western tribes of Victoria, Australia, believe that if an enemy can get hold of so much as a bone from the meat one has eaten, that he can bring illness upon you. Should anything belonging to an unfriendly tribe be found, it is given to the chief, who preserves it as a means of injuring the enemy. It is loaned to any one of the tribe who wishes to vent his spite against any of the unfriendly tribe. When used as a charm, it is rubbed over with emu-fat mixed with clay, and tied to the point of a spear. This is stuck upright in the ground before the camp fire. The company sit watching it, but at such a distance that their shadows cannot fall on it. They keep chanting imprecations on the enemy till the spear thrower turns around and falls in his direction. Any of these people believe that by getting a bone or other refuse of an enemy, he has the power of life and death over him, be it man, woman, or child. He can kill his enemy by sticking the bone firmly by the fire. No matter how distant, the person will waste away. This same belief is found among the American Indians.

  59. It is a common belief among the American Indians that certain medicine men possess the power of taking life by shooting needles, straws, spiders' webs, bullets and other objects, however distant the person may be at whom they are directed. Thus, in "Cloud Shield's Winter Count for 1824-1825," CatOwner was killed with a spider-web thrown at him by a Dakota. It reached the heart of the victim from the hand of the man who threw it, and caused him to bleed to death from the nose. (Mallery, "Picture Writing of the American Indians.")

  60. In the North of Scotland, a peculiar piece of witchcraft is still practiced, where a cowardly, yet deadly, hatred is cherished against a person. A "body of clay," called in GaeKc "Carp Creaah," is made as nearly as possible to resemble the one sought to be injured. This is placed, in great secrecy, in the stream of some shadowy burn. The belief is that as the body of clay wastes away from the action of the water, the victim sought to be cursed will as surely waste away to death.

  61. One of the charms formerly most dreaded by the natives of Madagascar, was called berika. It is said to be most deadly in its effects, bringing about the death of the victim by bursting his heart, and causing him to vomit immense quantities of blood. Even the possessor of this charm stood in terror of it, and none but the most reckless of charm-dealers and sorcerers would have anything to do with it. It was popularly supposed to have an inherent liking for blood, and that it would at times demand from its owner to be allowed to go forth to destroy some living tiling; at one time it would demand a bullock, at another a sheep or pig, at another a fowl, and occasionally its ferocity would only be satisfied with a human victim. The owner was obliged to comply with its demands and perform the appropriate incantations so as to set it at liberty to proceed on its fatal errand, lest it should turn on him and strike him dead. In fact, the charm was of so uncertain a temper, so to speak, that its owner was never sure of his own life, as it might at any moment turn upon him and destroy him, out of sheer ferocity.

  62. Another powerful charm is called manara-mody. It is supposed to follow the person to be injured, and on his arrival home, to bring upon him a serious illness or cause his immediate death. For instance, a person goes down from the interior to the coast for the purpose of trade. In some business transaction, he unfortunately excites the anger of a man with whom he is dealing, and who determines to seek revenge. For this purpose, he buys from a charm-dealer the charm called manara-mody. The trader, having finished his business on the coast, starts homeward, all unconscious that his enemy has sent the fatal charm after him to dog his steps through forest and swamp, over hill and valley. At length he reaches his home, thankful to be once more with his family. But alas! the rejoicing is soon turned to mourning, for the remorseless charm does its work, and smites the victim with sore disease, or slays him outright at once.

Found in:
Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences

Monday, August 30, 2010

Need A Reason to Stay in Bed?


Here's a listing of the "Fatal Days" of the year -
if today is one of those days, maybe you should just stay in bed!

January.
Of this first month the opening day
And seventh, like a sword will slay.

February.
The fourth day bringeth down to death,
The third will stop a strong man's breath.

March.
The first the greedy glutton slays,
The fourth cuts short the drunkard's days.

April.
The tenth and the eleventh too,
Are ready death's fell 'work to do.

May.
The third to slay poor man hath power.
The seventh destroyeth in an hour.

June.
The tenth a pallid visage shows,
No faith nor truth the fifteenth knows.

July.
The thirteenth is a fatal day,
The tenth alike will mortals slay.

August.
The first kills strong ones at a blow.
The second lays a cohort low.

September.
The third day of the month September
And tenth bring evil to each member.

October.
The third and tenth with poisoned breath
To men are foes as foul as death.

November.
The fifth bears stings of deadly pain,
The third is in destruction's train.

December.
The seventh is a fatal day for human life,
The tenth is with a serpent's venom rife.

Found in:
Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences

Having A Bad Day?


Grab your calendar and mark the days!
Here we have a list of the 56 Unfortunate days of the year:

January:
7 days: 3, 4, 6, 13, 14, 20, 21.

February:
7 days: 3, 7, 9, 12, 16, 17, 23.

March:
8 days: 1, 2, 5, 8, 12, 16, 28, 29.

April:
2 days: 24, 25.

May:
5 days: 17, 20, 27, 29, 30.

June:
8 days: 1, 5, 6, 9, 12, 16, 18, 24.

July:
4 days: 3, 10, 17, 18.

August:
2 days: 15, 20.

September:
2 days: 9, 16.

October:
6 days: 4, 9, 11, 17, 27, 31.

November:
4 days: 3, 9, 10, 21.

December:
2 days: 14, 21.

Found in:
Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences

Is Today Your Lucky Day?


Grab your calendar and mark the days!
What we have here is a list of the 53 Fortunate days of the year:

January:
6 days: 1, 2, 15, 26, 27 and 28.

February:
4 days: 11, 21, 25, 26.

March:
2 days: 10, 24.

April:
5 days: 6, 15, 16, 20, 28.

May:
3 days: 3, 18, 31.

June:
5 days: 10, 11, 15, 22, 25.

July:
3 days: 9, 15, 28.

August:
6 days: 6, 7, 10, 11, 19, 25.

September:
5 days: 4, 8, 17, 18, 23.

October:
5 days: 3, 7, 16, 21, 22.

November:
3 days: 5, 14, 20.

December:
6 days: 15, 19, 20, 22, 23, 25.

Found in:
Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences

Friday, August 27, 2010

Make A Voodoo Doll Out Of Anything!

This is the first in a series of videos by Planet Voodoo on how to make a Voodoo doll out of absolutely anything. In this episode, Voodoo Mama takes you on a hunt for junk in some barns and show you how to make a guardian Ju Ju using all salvaged items. It's Voodoo Gone Green, y'all.

How To Make A Voodoo Doll



Here's a trippy little movie conjured up by Planet Voodoo showing how to make your very own New Orleans-style Voodoo Hoodoo doll.

Make A Money Dollie


Cut out the shape you desire from green flannel: the doll could be a person, an elephant, a leprechaun, mermaid, or whatever you envision.

Stuff it with dillweed and Irish moss, then sew it up and embellish it as desired.

Talk to the doll; tell it your troubles and request advice before you go to sleep. Pay attention to your dreams.

Source: Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Magickal Uses of Corn


Corn aka maize, is the seed of seeds. Key words associated with corn magick are: Sacred Mother, Protection, Luck, Divination.

Corn represents fertility and is used to invoke Mother Earth. Used at Mabon and Lammas in ritual, it teaches the mystery of life, death, and rebirth. Many cultures gave corn, which is regarded as a food of prosperity, protection, and spirituality, a special god or goddess of its own.

  • Eat yellow corn on the summer solstice for blessings and prosperity.
  • Consume white corn for spiritual insight.
  • Scatter blue corn meal to purify and bless a space.
  • Hang red corn above doorways at harvest time to protect rewards that have been reaped.
  • Corn on the cob represents the phallic gods and draws creative or sexual energy.
  • Financial or love wishes that are shouted out as popcorn is popping will come true.
  • Cornsilk is a very powerful ingredient when added to love spells; it is designed to attract the person you desire.
From: Encyclopedia of Magickal Ingredients

The Golden Corn


"Now o friends
Listen to the words of a dream
Each spring brings us new life
The golden corn refreshes us
And the pink corn makes us a necklace
...At least this we know:
The hearts of our friends are true."

- Aztec

Monday, August 02, 2010

Before


Before your magick has any potency
you need a clear mind.

~Mel White

Sunday, August 01, 2010

August Moon Names

What follows is a list (in alphabetical order) of the names given to the August moon. Also listed is the tradition and/or origin of that moon name:


Acorns Ripen Moon ~Maidu
Autumn Moon ~Taos
Barley Moon ~other
Berry Moon ~Anishnaabe
Big Harvest Moon ~Creek
Big Ripening Moon ~Creek
Blackberry Moon ~Wishram
Black Cherries Moon ~Sioux, Assiniboine
Corn Moon ~Medieval English
Corn Silk Moon ~Ponca
Cutter Moon ~Abernaki
Dispute Moon ~Celtic, Janic (full)
Dog Days Moon ~Yuchi, Colonial American, Algonquin
Drying Moon ~Cherokee
Edible Corn Moon ~Agonquin
Feather Shedding Moon ~Passamaquoddy
First Acorns ~Pomo
Freshness Moon ~Mohawk
Fruit Moon ~Cherokee
Geese Shedding Feathers Moon ~Arapaho
Grain Moon ~Cherokee
Green Corn Moon ~Algonquin
Harvest Moon ~Chinese, Janic (dark)
Heat Moon ~Creek
Joyful Moon ~Hopi
Last Fruit Moon ~Cherokee
Lightning Moon ~Neo Pagan
Middle Moon ~Potawatomi
Mulberries Moon ~Natchez
Red Moon ~Algonquin
Ripen Moon ~Dakota
Sturgeon Moon ~Algonquin
Yellow Flower Moon ~Osage
Yellow Leaves Moon ~Kiowa
Young Ducks Fly Moon ~Cree
Wheat Cut Moon ~San Juan
Women's Moon ~Choctaw
Wood Cutter’s Moon ~Algonquin
Wort Moon ~Medieval English
Wyrt Moon ~other

Source

Honoring The Past


In our modern world, it's often easy to forget the trials and tribulations our ancestors had to endure. For us, if we need a loaf of bread, we simply drive over to the local grocery store and buy a few bags of prepackaged bread. If we run out, it's no big deal, we just go and get more. When our ancestors lived, hundreds and thousands of years ago, the harvesting and processing of grain was crucial. If crops were left in the fields too long, or the bread not baked in time, families could starve. Taking care of one's crops meant the difference between life and death.

By celebrating Lammas as a harvest holiday, we honor our ancestors and the hard work they must have had to do in order to survive. This is a good time to give thanks for the abundance we have in our lives, and to be grateful for the food on our tables. Lammas is a time of transformation, of rebirth and new beginnings.

Symbols of the Season

The Wheel of the Year has turned once more, and you may feel like decorating your house accordingly. While you probably can't find too many items marked as "Lammas decor" in your local discount store, there are a number of items you can use as decoration for this harvest holiday.

  • Sickles and scythes, as well as other symbols of harvesting
  • Grapes and vines
  • Dried grains -- sheafs of wheat, bowls of oats, etc.
  • Corn dolls -- you can make these easily using dried husks
  • Early fall vegetables, such as squashes and pumpkins
  • Late summer fruits, like apples, plums and peaches
Crafts, Song and Celebration
Because of its association with Lugh, the skilled god, Lammas (Lughnasadh) is also a time to celebrate talents and craftsmanship. It's a traditional time of year for craft festivals, and for skilled artisans to peddle their wares. In medieval Europe, guilds would arrange for their members to set up booths around a village green, festooned with bright ribbons and fall colors. Perhaps this is why so many modern Renaissance Festivals begin around this time of year!

Lugh is also known in some traditions as the patron of bards and magicians. Now is a great time of year to work on honing your own talents. Learn a new craft, or get better at an old one. Put on a play, write a story or poem, take up a musical instrument, or sing a song. Whatever you choose to do, this is the right season for rebirth and renewal, so set today (August 1) as the day to share your new skill with your friends and family.

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