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We've had some drama and are currently doing some internal housekeeping and rewriting here on Gypsy Magic.

It's going to take a while to get things set right here and I am really sorry for any inconvenience this may cause. I apologize for links to a "page not found" instead of something cool and magickal.

Thursday, November 23, 2006

Madame Fortuna's Prosperity Oil

Madam Fortuna's Prosperity Oil


The optimum time to make this oil is 5 days following the new moon. But it can be made any time during the new or crescent moon phase.

Supplies:

  • A small item made of gold
  • Olive oil
  • Small clean container (preferably glass) with a tight fitting lid
  • Powdered cinnamon or cinnamon essential oil

Instructions:

  • Place the item made of gold into the container
  • Add a pinch of cinnamon or a drop of cinnamon essential oil
  • Pour enough olive into the container to cover the item and fill the container to the halfway mark.
  • Cradle the container in your hands and think about how grateful and happy you are for the prosperity that you already have, and for the prosperity that is coming to you.
  • Then gently breathe this gratitude and happiness into the container, continue to breathe it into the container until it has been filled the rest of the way to the top with loving gratitude.
  • Put the lid on the container, and tighten it.
  • Tap the lid with your middle finger once and say "Thank you to the Father"
  • Tap the lid with your middle finger a second time and say "Thank you to the Mother"
  • Tap the lid with your middle finger for a third time and say "Thank you to the Living Spirit in all things"

This prosperity oil will gradually increase in potency as the moon waxes toward full, and can be used at any time.

On the full moon:

  • Remove the gold item - and gently and lovingly clean it.
  • Drop a pinch of powdered ginger into the container.
  • Cradle the container in your hands and think about how grateful and happy you are for the prosperity that you already have, and for the prosperity that is coming to you.
  • Put the lid on the container, and tighten it.
  • Tap the lid with your middle finger once and say "Thank you to the Father"
  • Tap the lid with your middle finger a second time and say "Thank you to the Mother"
  • Tap the lid with your middle finger for a third time and say "Thank you to the Living Spirit in all things"
Hints and tips:

  • If it seems that there is no prosperity in your life to be grateful for, think of something that makes you happy, or someone you love.
  • A Sacajawea gold dollar is a great item to use - and they can be purchased for $1 at your local bank.

Wednesday, November 22, 2006

Making Miracles Happen

Gypsies are famous for their "happy go lucky" attitude. Here is a small but significant "affirmation" or "charm" to do each morning.

Begin your day by saying out loud and with conviction:

"A miracle is going to happen today."

This attracts good fortune and has a magnetic and cumulative effect.

Within a short space of time, you will receive a fantastic telephone call, or letter, or you will meet with someone who will change your life for the better.



A larger, uncropped version of this image can be found at Friedman Archives.


This spell courtesy of:

The Good Spell Book: Love Charms, Magical Cures, and Other Practical Sorcery by Gillian Kemp

Wednesday, November 15, 2006

The Historical Gypsy


The first gypsies claimed to be the Christian nobility of Egypt, who had abandoned their possessions in order to retain their faith when the Muslims gained power. They were believed for a good period.
However, linguistic evidence strongly demonstrates that they actually originated in India, and moved west, migrating through the middle east into Europe. Although the Gypsies call themselves 'Rom' and their language is known as'Romani', the Romani language has nothing in common with the language known as Romanian (which is a Romance language, derived from Latin and kin to French, Spanish, Italian, etc.). Romanibeen shown to be closely related to groups of languages and dialects (such as Hindi, Gujarati, Marathi and Cashmiri) still spoken in India and of the same origin as Sanskrit.

They were often described as dark-skinned magicians, entertainers, smiths, horsebreakers and other skilled tradeworkers. There is a good possibility that they originated belly dancing.

They lived in tents. Ggypsy wagons are a recent introduction. The wagons date from the late 18th early 19th century. Before that, they travelled by foot and horseback, setting up tents by night. The classic gypsy caravan wagons were usually built by commercial carriage shops for the gypsies, since they took a lot of woodworking and other equipment.

Reliable period info on gypsies is sadly lacking- the only people writing about them were the ones who wanted rid of them at all cost. I think it was in the fifteenth century that the pogroms against them really got rolling...Because gypsies have remained very secluded and secretive, cultural "tainting" has been comparatively low, and modern practices may well reflect medieval practices.

In France it was thought that these same people came from Bohemia and thus they were called 'Bohemes'.... [thus began the English word "bohemian"]. There are Elizabethan laws against dressing or acting "as an Egyptian," which from the descriptions seem to be what we would call 'gypsies.' It is quite possible that the word "gypsy" came into use as an abreviation of "Egyptian" somewhat later than the actual arrival of the Rom in England.
The Romnichels, or Rom'nies, began to come to the United States from England in 1850. Their arrival coincided with an increase in the demand for draft horses in agriculture and then in urban transportation. Many Romnichels worked as horse traders, both in the travel-intensive acquisition of stock and in long-term urban sales stable enterprise. After the rapid decline in the horse trade following the First World War, most Romnichels relied on previously secondary enterprises, "basket-making," including the manufacture and sale of rustic furniture, and fortune telling.

The Rom arrived in the United States and Canada from Serbia, Russia and Austria-Hungary beginning in the 1880s, as part of the larger wave of immigration from southern and eastern Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Primary immigration ended, for the most part, in 1914, with the beginning of the First World War and subsequent tightening of immigration restrictions. Many in this group specialized in coppersmith work, mainly the repair and refining of industrial equipment used in bakeries, laundries, confectioneries and other businesses. The Rom, too, developed the fortune-telling business in urban areas.

The Ludar, or "Rumanian Gypsies," emigrated to North America during the great immigration from southern and eastern Europe between 1880 and 1914. Most of the Ludar came from northwestern Bosnia. Upon their arrival in North America they specialized as animal trainers and show people, and indeed passenger manifests show bears and monkeys as a major part of their baggage. Only a handful of items covering this group have been published, beginning in 1902. The ethnic language of the Ludar is a form of Romanian. They are occasionally referred to as Ursari in the literature.

Gypsies from Germany, generally referred to in the literature as Chikeners (Pennsylvania German, from German Zigeuner), sometimes refer to themselves as "Black Dutch." (While the term "Black Dutch" has been adopted by these German Gypsies, it does not originate with this group and has been used ambiguously to refer to several non-Gypsy populations.) They are few in number and claim to have largely assimilated to Romnichel culture. In the past known as horse traders and basket makers, some continue to provide baskets to US Amish and Mennonite communities. The literature on this group is very sparse and unreliable.

The Hungarian (or Hungarian-Slovak) musicians also came to this country with the eastern European immigration. In the United States they continued as musicians to the Hungarian and Slovak immigrant settlements, and count the musical tradition as a basic cultural element.

The Irish Travelers immigrated, like the Romnichels, from the mid to late nineteenth century. The Irish Travelers specialized in the horse and mule trade, as well as in itinerant sales of goods and services; the latter gained in importance after the demise of the horse and mule trade. The literature also refers to this group as Irish Traders or, sometimes, Tinkers. Their ethnic language is referred to in the literature as Irish Traveler Cant.

The present population of Scottish Travelers in North America also dates from about 1850, although the 18th-century transportation records appear to refer to this group. Unlike that of the other groups, Scottish Traveler immigration has been continuous. Also unlike the other groups, Scottish Travelers have continued to travel between Scotland and North America, as well as between Canada and the United States, after immigration. Scottish Travelers also engaged in horse trading, but since the first quarter of the 20th century have specialized in itinerant sales and services.

Much of this information came from the Gypsy Lore Society.

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

Recommended Reading

Our recommended reading list is as follows:

Sunday, November 12, 2006

Welcome

Welcome to Gypsy Magic Spells and Charms. This blog has been created in tandem with The Prosperity Project. The intent being to provide a spell, recipe, or something of interest every day. The first 30 days will be devoted to prosperity spells only. As time passes, we plan to provide spells, charms, activities, recipes, and a number of interesting tasks etc. on every conceivable subject. Thank you for your interest.

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